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Announcing openSUSE Education Li-f-e 13.1

December 17th, 2013 by

Get Li-f-e from here : Direct Download | Torrents | Metalinks | md5sum

openSUSE Education community is proud to bring you an early Christmas and New Year’s present: openSUSE Education Li-f-e. It is based on the recently released openSUSE 13.1 with all the official online updates applied.

We have put together a nice set of tools for everyone including teachers, students, parents and IT administrators.  It covers quite a lot of territory: from chemistry, mathematics to astronomy and Geography. Whether you are into software development or just someone looking for Linux distribution that comes with everything working out of the box, your search ends here.

Edit: We now also have x86_64 version supporting UEFI boot available for download.

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Hongkong OpenStack Design Summit

November 13th, 2013 by

So last week many OpenStack (cloud software) developers met in Hongkong’s world expo halls to discuss the future development and show off what is done already.

Overall, I heard there were 3000 attendees, with 800 being developers or so. That sounds like a large number of people, but luckily everything felt well-organized and the rooms were always big enough to have seats for all interested.

The design sessions were usually pretty low-level and focused into one component, so it was not easy for me to make useful contributions in there. The session about read-only API access (e.g. for helpdesk workers and monitoring) and about HA were most useful to me.

In the breakout rooms were interesting sessions by many large OpenStack users (CERN, Ebay, Paypal, Dreamhost, Rackspace) giving valuable insights into what people expect from and do with a cloud. Many of them are using custom-built parts, because the plain OpenStack is still not complete to run a cloud. SUSE Cloud ships with some such missing parts (e.g. deployment and configuration management), but most organisations seem to run their own at the moment.

Cloudbase was there telling about their Hyper-V support that we integrated in SUSE Cloud.
Apart from the 6 SUSE Cloud developers there were several local (and one Australian) SUSE guys manning the booth.

Overall it was quite some experience to be there (in such an exotic and yet nice place) and listen and talk to so many different people from very different backgrounds.

CLI to upload image to openstack cloud

April 18th, 2012 by

I work on automatic testing of one of our products that creates other projects.
And because there is a lot of clouds everywhere I want to use them too. We
have internally an OpenStack cloud (still Diablo release). So I need to solve
automatic uploading of images built in the Build Service. Below I describe my working version.

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openSUSE Edu Li-f-e 12.1 out now!

December 22nd, 2011 by

openSUSE Education team is proud to present another edition of openSUSE-Edu Li-f-e (Linux for Education) based on openSUSE 12.1. Li-f-e comes loaded with everything that students, parents, teachers and system admins of educational institutions may need.

  more screenshots…

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1-2-3 Cloud

June 20th, 2011 by

Towards the end of last year there was an article in openSUSE news “announcing” the cloud efforts in the openSUSE project and on OBS. Well, cloud is still all the rage (see Jos’ contribution to openSUSE News issue 180) and people just cannot stop talking about cloud computing.

Using openSUSE as a host for your cloud infrastructure is also making great progress. We have 3 cloud projects in OBS and hopefully these cover your favorite cloud infrastructure code, Virtualization:Cloud:Eucalyptus, Virtualization:Cloud:OpenNebula, and Virtualization:Cloud:OpenStack. The projects provide repositories for Eucalyptus, OpenNebula, and OpenStack, respectively.

We attempt to make it relatively easy to get a cloud up and running. In this process OpenNebula and OpenStack have progressed the most. Eucalyptus is working, but due to an issue with Eucalyptus and openSSL 1.0 and later (the version in openSUSE) automation has to wait until these issues are resolved.

For OpenNebula we now have a KIWI example that shows how one can get a cloud setup from scratch in less than 2 hours, including the image build. The example contains a firstboot workflow for the head node, and self configuration of cloud nodes.

For OpenStack SUSE Gallery images are in the works and will be published in the near future.

All repositories provide packages you can install on running openSUSE systems. If you are interested in using openSUSE as the underlying OS for your cloud or if you want to contribute to the cloud projects, subscribe to the cloud mailing list opensuse-cloud@opensuse.org

Make vmware workstation 7.1.3 running with opensuse 11.4 (kernel 2.6.37)

November 15th, 2010 by

Note about the 2.6.37xx

There’s a solution to make the kernel modules building under openSUSE factory (11.4) and the kernel 2.6.37

Preparation

download the lastest vmware workstation 7.1.3 (the patch is only for this version)
download the patch vmware-7.1.3-2.6.37-rc5.patch
download the script to patch patch-modules_v62-opensuse.sh

Install

Proceed to the normal installation of workstation, if you have older version, it will be replaced
by running under root account

sh VMware-Workstation-Full-7.1.3-324285.x86_64.bundle

Patch

Now we have to apply the needed patch, just run as root

sh patch-modules_v62-opensuse.sh

Here the output result

sh patch-modules_v62-opensuse.sh 
(Stripping trailing CRs from patch.)
patching file vmci-only/include/compat_semaphore.h
(Stripping trailing CRs from patch.)
patching file vmmon-only/linux/driver.c
(Stripping trailing CRs from patch.)
patching file vmnet-only/compat_semaphore.h
(Stripping trailing CRs from patch.)
patching file vsock-only/shared/compat_semaphore.h
Stopping VMware services:
   VMware USB Arbitrator                                               done
   VM communication interface socket family                            done
   Virtual machine communication interface                             done
   Virtual machine monitor                                             done
   Blocking file system                                                done
Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only'
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.37-rc5-12-desktop/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C ../../../linux-2.6.37-rc5-12 O=/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop/. modules
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/driver.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/iommu.o
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/iommu.c: In function ‘IOMMUUnregisterDeviceInt’:
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/iommu.c:217:17: warning: ignoring return value of ‘device_attach’, declared with attribute warn_unused_result
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/hostif.o
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/hostif.c: In function ‘HostIFReadUptimeWork’:
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/hostif.c:2004:37: warning: ‘newUpBase’ may be used uninitialized in this function
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/linux/driverLog.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/memtrack.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/vmx86.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/cpuid.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/task.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/hashFunc.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/comport.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/common/phystrack.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/vmcore/moduleloop.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/vmmon.o
  Building modules, stage 2.
  MODPOST 1 modules
  CC      /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/vmmon.mod.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only/vmmon.ko
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C $PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= postbuild
make[1]: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only'
make[1]: `postbuild' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only'
cp -f vmmon.ko ./../vmmon.o
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmmon-only'
Built vmmon module
Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only'
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.37-rc5-12-desktop/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C ../../../linux-2.6.37-rc5-12 O=/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop/. modules
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/driver.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/hub.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/userif.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/netif.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/bridge.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/filter.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/procfs.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/smac_compat.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/smac.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/vnetEvent.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/vnetUserListener.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/vmnet.o
  Building modules, stage 2.
  MODPOST 1 modules
  CC      /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/vmnet.mod.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only/vmnet.ko
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C $PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= postbuild
make[1]: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only'
make[1]: `postbuild' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only'
cp -f vmnet.ko ./../vmnet.o
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmnet-only'
Built vmnet module
Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only'
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.37-rc5-12-desktop/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C ../../../linux-2.6.37-rc5-12 O=/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop/. modules
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/filesystem.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/dentry.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/stubs.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/dbllnklst.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/file.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/block.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/module.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/super.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/inode.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/linux/control.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/vmblock.o
  Building modules, stage 2.
  MODPOST 1 modules
  CC      /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/vmblock.mod.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only/vmblock.ko
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C $PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= postbuild
make[1]: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only'
make[1]: `postbuild' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only'
cp -f vmblock.ko ./../vmblock.o
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmblock-only'
Built vmblock module
Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only'
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.37-rc5-12-desktop/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C ../../../linux-2.6.37-rc5-12 O=/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop/. modules
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/linux/driver.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/linux/driverLog.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/linux/vmciKernelIf.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciDatagram.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciDriver.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciDs.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciContext.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciHashtable.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciEvent.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciQueuePair.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciGroup.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciResource.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/common/vmciProcess.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/vmci.o
  Building modules, stage 2.
  MODPOST 1 modules
  CC      /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/vmci.mod.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only/vmci.ko
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C $PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= postbuild
make[1]: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only'
make[1]: `postbuild' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only'
cp -f vmci.ko ./../vmci.o
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vmci-only'
Built vmci module
Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only'
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.37-rc5-12-desktop/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C ../../../linux-2.6.37-rc5-12 O=/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop/. modules
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/af_vsock.o
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/af_vsock.c: In function ‘VSockVmciStreamConnect’:
/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/af_vsock.c:3172:4: warning: case value ‘255’ not in enumerated type ‘socket_state’
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/vsockAddr.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/util.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/stats.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/linux/notify.o
  CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/driverLog.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/vsock.o
  Building modules, stage 2.
  MODPOST 1 modules
  CC      /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/vsock.mod.o
  LD [M]  /tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only/vsock.ko
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/linux-2.6.37-rc5-12-obj/x86_64/desktop'
make -C $PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. \
  MODULEBUILDDIR= postbuild
make[1]: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only'
make[1]: `postbuild' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only'
cp -f vsock.ko ./../vsock.o
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-root/modules/vsock-only'
Built vsock module
Starting VMware services:
   VMware USB Arbitrator                                               done
   Virtual machine monitor                                             done
   Virtual machine communication interface                             done
   VM communication interface socket family                            done
   Blocking file system                                                done
   Virtual ethernet                                                    done
   Shared Memory Available                                             done


All done, you can now run VMWare WorkStation.
Modules sources backup can be found in the '/usr/lib/vmware/modules/source-workstation7.1.3-2010-12-13-19:07:07-backup' directory

References

vmware community post
vmware community thread

Mark D Bernstein aka InitiaZero for providing the script and patch by email and having ping me about it

Enjoy, and thanks to people having done the crappy job before.

OBS 2.1: Status of SuperH (sh4) support with QEMU

October 24th, 2010 by

With established ARM support in OBS the as well as emulated MIPS and PowerPC is getting more mature, the last big embedded architecture not working in OBS with QEMU user mode was SH4. QEMU developers community had done a lot of work in improving QEMU user mode during the last months, so I can proudly present with currently only a few patches to QEMU git master OBS builds working with the SH4 port of Debian Sid. The new QEMU 0.13 released recently is a big milestone for this.

Another news is that I had fixed the bugs in Virtual Machine builds (build script) when using them with some architectures like PowerPC 32bit and SH4. So now also the combination of using for example KVM (XEN should also work) in a worker together with ARM, MIPS, PowerPC and SH4 is working. The appropriate fixes are in one of the next build script releases (if not even released already now with OBS 2.1, I have to check that). You can select architecture “sh4” with OBS 2.1 and also start a scheduler with “sh4”.

With the use of the QEMU User Mode, you can build also accelerated native cross toolchains for your host architecture so time critical parts like the compiler can run without the emulator. This works with .deb as well as with .rpm based backages. The MeeGo Project as well as the openSUSE Port to ARM uses this technique to provide an optimum between compatibility and performance. It means you can mix natively build packages and use cross toolchains on it. The “CBinstall:” feature helps you to use native or cross builds automatically depending on if your build host is a native machine or a x86 machine with cross build. In summary, we have the current classics of linux embedded archs together now in OBS: ARM, x86, MIPS 32, PowerPC 32 and SH4.

I have uploaded the fixed QEMU package to the OBS project openSUSE:Tools:Unstable inside the package “qemu-devel” after some more testing. I have of course also a OBS meta prjconf file working with Debian Sid. The SH4 port of Debian Sid you can find at Debian Ports Site.

And last but not least I would like to thank Riku Voipio of the Debian Project, QEMU project and MeeGo project and other major contributors during the QEMU 0.13 development cycle for the restless work on QEMU user mode improvements. In case of KVM, QEMU is used even twice, with QEMU-KVM as well as QEMU User Mode. I am sure I had forgotten other important people, so thanks to them also.

Matryoshka

October 20th, 2010 by

A matryoshka doll, also known as a Russian nesting doll or a babushka doll, is a set of dolls of decreasing sizes placed one inside the other. A set of matryoshkas consists of a wooden figure which separates, top from bottom, to reveal a smaller figure of the same sort inside, which has, in turn, another figure inside of it, and so on. Matryoshka Doll

Virtualization is a concept similar to the Matryoshka analogy. There is another system running inside the host machine. So it is box in a box. There are many virtualization techniques available at the disposal of the user; vmware, virtualbox, xen to name a few which requires lots of resources. Another alternative which is OpenVZ , container-based virtualization for Linux. Each container performs and executes exactly like a stand-alone server; a container can be rebooted independently and have root access, users, IP addresses, memory, processes, files, applications, system libraries and configuration files.

Here is a quote from TechRepublic Blog :

In the past we have looked at using OpenVZ for container virtualization on Linux. OpenVZ is great as it allows you to run compartmentalized “servers” within an operating system so you can separate systems, much like running virtual machines on a host system. With OpenVZ, you can get the benefits of virtualization without the overhead.

The downside of OpenVZ is that it isn’t in the mainline kernel. This means you need to run a kernel provided by the OpenVZ project. By itself this isn’t necessarily a problem, unless you are running an unsupported Linux distribution, and also if you don’t mind a bit of lag from upstream security fixes

So what is an alternative; well maybe lxc is the answer.According to http://lxc.sourceforge.net/

The  container  technology  is actively being pushed into the mainstream linux kernel. It provides the resource management through the control groups aka process containers and resource isolation through the namespaces.

There is very little information regarding LXC in the opensuse wiki and the only one available is still draft, yet provides enough information to start rolling up your containers.  Here is the preamble of the above mentioned page:

LXC is a form of paravirtualization. Being a sort of super duper chroot jail, it is limited to running linux binaries, but offers essentially native perfomance as if those binaries were running as normal processes right in the host kernel. Which in fact, they are.

LXC is interesting primarily in that:

  • It can be used to run a mere application, service, or a full operating system.
  • It offers essentially native performance. A binary running as an LXC guest is actually running as a normal process directly in the host os kernel just like any other process. In particular this means that cpu and i/o scheduling are a lot more fair and tunable, and you get native disk i/o performance which you can not have with real virtualization (even Xen, even in paravirt mode) This means you can containerize disk i/o heavy database apps. It also means that you can only run binaries that the host kernel can execute. (ie: you can run Linux binaries, not another OS like Solaris or Windows)

The same page also states there is not another HOWTO or documentation explaining how to use lxc with opensuse even though the lxc package has been part of the main oss repo since 11.2 version. Furthermore there are no scripts like lxc-fedora or lxc-debian  that will automate the creation or installation of opensuse. Now while it may be true that there are no opensuse specific scripts are available (at least I could not find through a Google search), though there is an interesting video on youtube showing the lxc with opensuse 11.2.

Based on the the information on the LXC wiki page, using the  SUSEStudio , I built an appliance which  is almost ready to use lxc. In order to create a container image, a very primitive lxc_opensuse script that will do a fairly basic job is also included. Once the script is issued,it will download opensuse 11.3 base system and the user can start playing with the wonders of lxc. For the impatient, who wants do discover Matryoshka, here is the link for  the appliance .

Have fun with Matryoshka !

OBS 2.1: ACL Feature and Status

August 15th, 2010 by

One and a half year is now gone since I posted about my work for ARM support in the OBS and the work for a port of openSUSE to ARM. Lots of things had happened in the meantime that are related, from my limited view most notably Nokia and Intel joining Moblin and Maemo to MeeGo (MeeGo is currently working on a number of Atom and ARM based devices), chosing to use OBS as build system and last but not least myself joining The Linuxfoundation (you will be not surprised to hear that I work at LF on OBS). In the meantime there had also been a major new OBS release 1.8/2.0 with a bunch of new features.

Interesting is the fact that we adapted the cross build system for OBS to MeeGo, first developed for use in Maemo and openSUSE @ ARM. An improved version for the standard MeeGo releases, and for the MeeGo weekly snapshots is used in the MeeGo OBS System to build all ARM releases of MeeGo (the cross toolchain will later get part of the MeeGo SDK @ ARM), thanks to Jan-Simon Möller (In the openSUSE ML, the issue of reactivating openSUSE:Factory ARM builds were brought up. So it might be a good variant to backport Jan-Simons new solution back into openSUSE @ ARM for that purpose). All the MeeGo related OBS installations will move sooner or later to OBS 2.1.

But now to the most recent work, Access Control support. A preview was shipped with OBS 1.8. Now an own OBS version, 2.1, will be dedicated to the introduction of this single new feature into the OBS mainline: Access Control (or abbrevated ACL for Access Control Lists). ACL means that there is control by the user on a per project or per package basis to protect information, source and binaries from the read access of other users in an OBS system and to hide projects or packages.

What is the intended audience of ACL? ACL is intended for installations of OBS that require protection of projects or packages during work. This can be but is not limited to commercial installations of OBS, or semi public installations of OBS.

How does ACL work? ACL sits on top of two features introduced with OBS 2.0: Role and Permission Management as well as freely definable user groups. ACL uses 4 specifically defined permissions (‘source_access’ for read access to sources, ‘private_view’ for viewing package and project information, ‘download_binaries’ for read access to binaries and ‘access’ permission to protect and hide everything and all from read access and viewing) on a user or group in the Role and Permission management. Also, the preexisting roles “maintainer”, “reader” and “downloader” had been modified with specific predifined permissions (which can at any time changed with the role and permission editor dynamically). And last but not least 4 new flags (namely ‘sourceaccess’ to signal a project/package has read protected source code, ‘binarydownload’ to signal it has read protected packages, ‘privacy’ to signal information/logfiles or status cannot be read and ‘access’ to hide and protect a project or package completely in all possible OBS API calls) had been added to the project and package descriptions to signal that some information is only readable by specific users or groups, or that information is hidden.

How do I use ACL? There are 4 steps to use ACL (a part of them a optional and can only be performed by the Administator of an OBS instance). Step one is to assign the listed permissions to a role, user or group (this step can be done only by the admin, and is not needed for the predefined roles “maintainer”, “reader” and “downloader”). Step two is to add a group for special users to projects which are intended to be run with ACL (this operations can only be performed by the admin). Step three is to protect a project with appropriate protection flags at project creation by adding them to the project meta. Step four is to add other users or groups with one of the new predefined roles that has ACL permissions added to the project meta.

What information can be protected by ACL? The protected information is grouped into 4 categories. Category 1 (flag ‘sourceaccess’) is source code. Category 2 (flag ‘binarydownload’) is binary packages or logfiles or builds. Category 3 (flag ‘privacy’) is project or package information like build status. Category 4 (flag ‘access’) is all viewable or accessable information to any project or package (full blocking of all access and information).

Example of a project configuration using ACL:

<user userid="MartinMohring" role="maintainer" />
<!-- grant user full write and read access -->

<group groupid="MeeGo-Reviewer" role="maintainer" />
<!-- grant group full write and read access -->

<group groupid="MeeGo-Developers" role="reader" />
<!-- grant group full source read access -->

<group groupid="MeeGo-BetaTesters" role="downloader" />
<!-- grant group access to packages/images -->

  <sourceaccess>
    <disable/>
  </sourceaccess>
  <!-- disable read access - unless granted explictely.
          This flag will not accept arch or repository arguments. -->

  <binarydownload>
    <disable/>
  </binarydownload>
  <!-- disable access - unless granted explictely -
          to packages/image and logfiles -->

  <access>
    <disable/>
  </access>
  <!-- disable access - unless granted explictely-,
          project will not visible or found via search,
          nor will any source or binary or logfile be accessable.
          This flag will not accept arch or repository arguments. -->

  <privacy>
    <enable/>
  </privacy>
  <!-- project will not visible.
          This flag will not accept arch or repository arguments. -->

What is the current status of the ACL implementation? The current status is that the complete API of the OBS git master had been instrumented with ACL code, critical portions of the API controllers had been code inspected and a big portion of these API calls now have a testcase in the OBS testsuite. Work is ongoing to make ACL as secure as possible. A code drop of current git master is under test in some bigger OBS systems, most notably the openSUSE Buildsystem. You can find snapshots of this codebase as usual in the OBS project openSUSE:Tools:Unstable. Adrian Schröter updates these “Alpha Snapshots” relatively often, on a 1-2 weekly basis, and runs the testsuite on git master daily. Thanks to Jan-Simon Möller for putting in many of the testcases into the testsuite for the ACL checks. On OBS Testing in general, read also Development and Test.

What is next? Code is tested and debugged against granting unwanted access due to some concepts inside OBS that are “working against ACL”, like project or package links, aggregates or kiwi imaging. We will inform you interested user of course about beta releases and an official 2.1 release.

Stay tuned.

automated openSUSE testing

May 25th, 2010 by

Testing is an important task. But testing daily openSUSE-Factory snapshots would mean testing the same things every day. This would be pretty tiresome to people.
And there is a lot of software to test, including software unknown to most testers or new versions of known software, so how should the tester know if the results were the intended results?
My answer is: leave as much as possible to computers. Computers do not get tired. Computers do not stop testing something after a dozen identical results. Computers do not forget.

The following assumes that you have read my text on making openSUSE install videos.

So far, I am rather satisfied with my automated installations.
At the end of those, I added some basic application testing, which already showed in MS7
openSUSE-KDE-LiveCD-x86_64-Build0625a.ogv dated 2010-05-21 16:08
an issue filed 28 hours later at bnc bug 608087

Only that it currently still needs a human to look at the results.
I was thinking to improve upon that by scanning (rectangular) parts of the screenshot for known good or bad images. If either is found, the test could be automatically marked as passed or failed.
On unknown images, a human would still need to decide which part of the image is relevant and if it is good or bad. This decision can then be used to avoid human interaction (hard work) in further runs of that test.
If we push this further, it could be similar to nagios for network monitoring. Telling when something breaks and telling when something is back working. It could have an overview page about automated test status, giving totals e.g. “50 working, 10 unknown, 3 failing”. With links to more details.

The advantage in adding the application tests after the install test is that the system starts out in a clean, reproducible way. One disadvantage I see is that a newly failing test could prevent following tests to work.

I have also been working to enable others to run my isotovideo script. For that I have cleaned up my code so that it no more contains paths from my system. The other thing is that I documented how to get it working at http://www3.zq1.de/bernhard/git/autoinst/INSTALL

MS7 installation videos:

openSUSE-KDE-LiveCD-x86_64-Build0625c.ogv
openSUSE-KDE-LiveCD-i686-Build0625a.ogv
openSUSE-GNOME-LiveCD-x86_64-Build0625b.ogv
openSUSE-NET-x86_64-Build0623b.ogv
openSUSE-NET-i586-Build0623b.ogv
openSUSE-DVD-Build0625-x86_64b.ogv
openSUSE-DVD-Build0625-i586b.ogv