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Increase the thread/process limit for Chrome and Chromium to prevent “unable to create process” errors

July 25th, 2017 by

Browsers like Chrome, Chromium and Mozilla Firefox have moved to running tabs in separate threads and processes, to increase performance and responsiveness and to reduce the effects of crashes in one tab.

Occasionally, this exhausts the default limit on the amount of processes and threads that a user can have running.

Determine the maximum number of processes and threads in a user session:

$ ulimit -u
1200

The SUSE defaults are configured in /etc/security/limits.conf:

# harden against fork-bombs
* hard nproc 1700
* soft nproc 1200
root hard nproc 3000
root soft nproc 1850

In the above, * the catch-all for all users.

To raise the limit for a particular user, you can either edit /etc/security/limits.conf or create a new file /etc/security/limits.d/nproc.conf. Here is an example for /etc/security/limits.d/nproc.conf raising the limit for the user jdoe to 8k/16k threads and processes:

jdoe soft nproc 8192
jdoe hard nproc 16384

If you want to do that for a whole group, use the @ prefix:

@powerusers soft nproc 8192
@powerusers hard nproc 16384

In either case, this change is effective only for the next shell or login session.

Fun things to do with driver updates

March 16th, 2017 by

Today: But what if I need a new kernel?

A driver update (DUD) can of course update a single driver. But if that’s not enough and you need a whole new kernel to run an installation?

There are two parts to solve:

  1. replace the kernel used during installation and
  2. get the new kernel installed

We’ll need two tools for this (both available in Tumbleweed or here: mksusecd and mkdud).

1. Replace the kernel used during installation

For this it’s important to know which kernel packages you’ll actually need. Typically it will be kernel-default and kernel-firmware. But older SUSE distributions (SLE 11 comes to mind) had the kernel packages split into kernel-default and kernel-default-base – you’ll need them both.

To make things confusing, modern SUSE distributions also have kernel-default-base – but it’s an alternative to kernel-default. In this case we don’t need it.

If unsure, check kernel-default. If it contains the actual kernel (e.g. /boot/vmlinuz) then you don’t need kernel-default-base.

On some architectures modules are also taken from xen-kmp-default. If that’s important for you, you can add this package to the kernel list as well.

In fact you can add any number of kernel packages or kmps you like.

In the past, sometimes a different kernel flavor was used. For example PowerPC had kernel-ppc64 for a while. Simply use the flavor you need.

It’s a good idea to gather all the kernel rpms into a single directory for easier use:

> mkdir k
> cp kernel-default.rpm kernel-firmware.rpm k
> cp kernel-default-base.rpm k    # only if needed
# add any kernel-related rpms you need

Then, take your SUSE installation iso and run

> mksusecd --create new.iso \
  --kernel k/* -- \
  original_dvd1.iso

Note that the --kernel option accepts a variable number of arguments, so you have to add an isolated -- to terminate the argument list properly.

The output could look like this:

> mksusecd --create new.iso \
  --kernel k/* -- \
  SLES-11-SP4-DVD-ppc64-GM-DVD1.iso
kernel version: 3.0.101-63-ppc64 --> 3.0.101-94-ppc64
CHRP bootable (ppc64)
building: 100%
calculating sha1...

The command above will actually get the list of required modules from the old installation iso. If you are missing some driver or the new kernel comes with some additional driver, the module will not be added to the new iso.

But there’s the --modules option. It will add the listed modules together with any implicitly required modules via module dependencies.

For example, let’s add the airport wifi-module to our PowerPC iso:

> mksusecd --create new.iso \
  --kernel k/* \
  --modules airport -- \
  SLES-11-SP4-DVD-ppc64-GM-DVD1.iso
kernel version: 3.0.101-63-ppc64 --> 3.0.101-94-ppc64
kernel modules added:
  airport, cfg80211, orinoco
CHRP bootable (ppc64)
building: 100%
calculating sha1...

As you can see, it automatically adds orinoco and cfg80211 as well.

2. Get the new kernel installed

This is relatively simple. A driver update can do this:

> mkdud --create foo.dud \
  --dist sle11 \
  --install repo \
  k/*

This creates a driver update for SLE 11 (which also applies to SP4) and the kernel rpms are installed via an auto-generated add-on repo (--install repo).

Now we have the driver update that installs our kernel packages. But how do we use it?

We integrate it into our iso above!

> mksusecd --create new.iso \
  --initrd foo.dud \
  --kernel k/* -- \
  SLES-11-SP4-DVD-ppc64-GM-DVD1.iso

mksusecd has an --initrd option that directly accepts driver updates and integrates them into the iso.

3. Can I have a choice?

Maybe you just want to test this new kernel or sometimes need the old one and sometimes the new one. Can you make an installation iso that lets you choose the kernel?

Oh yes! ūüôā

> mksusecd --create new.iso \
  --add-entry 3.0.101-94 \
  --initrd foo.dud \
  --kernel k/* -- \
  SLES-11-SP4-DVD-ppc64-GM-DVD1.iso

This does not replace the old kernel but adds a new boot entry Installation - 3.0.101-94.

So you can install with old or the new kernel.

TOSprint or not to sprint?

February 27th, 2016 by

TOSprint Paris 2016

Report of a week of sprint

TOSprint in Paris has just ended (wiki page).

What a week!

First of all I want to warmfully thank the sponsors, especially Olivier Courtin from Oslandia for the organization, and Mozilla France for hosting us.

What is TOSprint?

Once a year a bunch of hackers from projects under OsGeo umbrella, meet in a face to face sprint.
This year it happenned in Paris with great number of participants (52).

There was globally five big groups, and if each community was running its own schedule,
there was a lot of cross echanges too.

TOSprint Mozilla

Mateusz ŇĀoskot

Personal objectives

My main objective, except being enough luckly to be a sponsor, was to go there and be in direct contact with upstream.

This can help a lot to improve packages, and create new ones.

Moreover, as one of my openSUSE’s Application:Geo peer maintainer, Angelos Kalkas was also participating, we decided to make somes changes, and improve the situation of the repository.

(more…)

Cleanup on OBS – Bacula packages to adopt

October 25th, 2015 by

I was one of the creator and maintainers of bacula packages on obs (Story started 4 years ago).
Since then (+3 years) I’m using another tool called Bareos, and have no more interest
nor time to maintain those packages.

Since sometimes, bacula project has released two main major version. (7.0 and 7.2).
Nobody has taken care of the packages available on obs Archiving:Backup, nor have
proposed an update. [1]

Those packages have never been submitted to Factory, and proposed to any released openSUSE version.
From one of the last upstream announcement Bacula project will deliver directly prebuild packages for major distributions.

So if you’re interested to take ownership of those, raise your hands now (ask maintainer status with obs interface).
I will let a grace period of one month before sending a delete request.

Have fun!

Lizards, time to pack your stuff for openSUSE miniSummit @Scale 13x

February 17th, 2015 by

Again this year the thirteen annual Southern California Linux Expo is in the starting block.

scale_13x_onair

During 3 days you will be able to visit us at our booth (38,39,40).
Yeah 3 booths cause we co-run the KDE and Gnome booth.
The exhibition hall open Friday afternoon at 2pm.


Drew and Peter are working as daemon to get everything ready to spread, Doug have brought also quite numerous goodies there. I will do my best to inform you here or follow my G+ channel
scale_13x_hands-feets

Whatever the way you come, bring your feet there and shake hands.
On Thursday, no one has to miss our full day of openSUSE mini-summit, room Century AB.
There will be interesting talks and also a full green hallway, We’re looking forward SUSE’s team, working together in this promising adventure.

scale13x_luggage_ready
On our side Geeko is ready to cross 9.000 kilometers tomorrow.
Hey cool first time in the famous Airbus A380…
Demo laptop with Tumbleweed and KF5 is also secured.



See you all in Los Angeles

Final Election Thoughts

January 22nd, 2015 by

As the openSUSE Board election quickly draws to a close, I take a moment to remind openSUSE Members to vote.

Elections and voting are a rather remarkable thing.¬† We take up or values, our beliefs, our interests, and briefly toss them in the air, letting the air flow somewhat disrupt them as they gently fall like leaves.¬† We think for a moment: What’s important to me?¬† Why is this important to me?¬† And does it really matter who I vote for?¬† Can a small Board of Directors really make a difference in the larger scheme of things?¬† Can the elected person really represent my interests?

In American politics, there is much apathy for and little trust in elections.¬† There are many reasons for this (and it’s a topic for discussion and reflection saved for a very different forum).¬† But as much analysis is done by professionals who analyze these things, they often conclude that each individual doesn’t think that one vote will matter.¬† “I’m just one person in an ocean of people; how will my vote matter?”¬† But for us, well, no one knows better about Freedom and Openness than an opensource community.¬† Voting — expressing one’s confidence in another person to serve as a representative of an ideal, a promise — is a hallmark of Freedom and Openness.¬† If only one vote is cast among many, then the ideal of only the one is expressed.¬† If your vote is not cast and the others of your community are, then your voice is diminished.¬† When a whole community votes, the full range voices is heard and discerned.

Vote.  Our community is strengthened when your vote is cast.  Whether or not you vote for me, please vote.

I believe it matters.

The election ends on Monday, 26 Jan 2015.

Standing for Re-Election to the openSUSE Board

January 12th, 2015 by

Hi Fellow Geekos,

This post is a summary of my wish to continue to serve on your behalf on the openSUSE board.

My term has been a short one, as I was appointed to serve out the remainder of Vincent Untz’ term.

While I now work for SUSE (and it has been a fabulous experience), that does not change my view or efforts to contribute to openSUSE.  Prior to joining SUSE, as a part of the Sales Engineering team, I was elected to the board for a two year term. To avoid having too many SUSE employees, I had to step down.  A rule I completely support.

Having been an openSUSE member long before joining SUSE, I think I have a keen awareness of what the community is about and where we can improve together.

My take is we have an awesome group of contributors who want to see the community grow and prosper.  With things like Tumbleweed and OBS, among others, we have shown real innovation and technical leadership in the Linux world. We have arguably one the top distros available.  It is solid, polished and usable for a wide variety of use cases. We need to keep the openness and solid collaboration which enables everyone to participate and succeed.

My efforts within openSUSE have been mostly focused on the Open Build Server, maintaining several projects, as well as, being part of the Factory review team.

Going forward, I want to concentrate on reaching out beyond our community to build more awareness of what an awesome distro we have, along with a pretty friendly community. I see other, less compelling, distros getting more visibility than perhaps is deserved.

Along the same lines, my take is we as a community can take a more active role in bringing in new members, who might not be technical folks, but can help in the marketing and outreach. I’ve started a local SUSE group through meetup.com which is a different way to find new users and contributors.

One other reason I wish to remain on the board, is we have a solid working relationship and there is a lot of mutual respect and good collaboration.

No matter who is elected to the board, I am very pleased with the caliber of the folks running and know the community will be in good hands moving forward.

Thank you in advance for your vote!

Peter Linnell

Testing Android in openQA

January 6th, 2015 by

The other day Richard described in his blog how how he used openQA to test drive Fedora. Around the same time I read about Android x86 and saw that they offer iso images for download. So I wondered how hard it would be to get that one tested in openQA.
(more…)

FGLRX – Warning openSUSE 13.2 / Tumbleweed

November 1st, 2014 by

NO AMD FGLRX driver for openSUSE 13.2 and Tumbleweed will be
ready for the release on November 4th.

The reason is a bug affecting FGLRX against the new xorg present in 13.2 and obviously in factory / tumbleweed.
November 4th, tumbleweed repositories will be switched to the new factory rolling tested.

I’ve decided that at that time, I will until a fixes deactivate and empty the factory and tumbleweed repositories for fglrx and fglrx-beta.

What to do

If you depend on fglrx and are under 13.1, try to avoid to upgrade until fglrx for 13.2 reappear

If you are under tumbleweed (13.1) with fglrx, you have two choices. Remove fglrx, used free radeon, and then you can upgrade to newer tumbleweed, or lock your repository, and wait the fix for fglrx

Hope to write very soon, a good news.

Ruby: Do not use += in loops

October 8th, 2014 by

Hi,
My motivation for writing this blog post is to have one simple place where I can point everybody using += in a loop. I will describe here why it can kill the performance of any application or library and will also show some measurement to demonstrate it. (more…)