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Create multi liveUSB with openSUSE

May 30th, 2015 by

I was trying to create a liveUSB with many distros. The reason is simple. All of my USB sticks were quite big for only one distro. So the rest of the USB space is wasted. For example, the openSUSE USBs I got from conferences, are 8GB. If I use installation DVD, I’m going to use only 4GB. LiveGNOME is only 1GB (the rest would be persistent drive for storage but personally, I don’t use it.

For that reason, I used 2 programs.

1. Multisystem.

I translated to Greek. Unfortunately, this software is installed only on Ubuntu/Debian distros. I used it also on Arch Linux but there was a problem lately and didn’t work correctly. On Ubuntu, I managed to insert 13.1 successfully and lately this was difficult to do. At the end of each time, there were some strange symbols running for a quite long time with a sound (I muted the sound for that reason). I think persistent drive for 13.2 and Tumbleweed wasn’t something that the creators of the program added.
DVD ISO and NET install ISO wasn’t at their list either.

2. YUMI

This works on Windows. At the end of the page there’s a version for Ubuntu/Debian (and source code). I didn’t test them.
I tested this tool and I inserted NET install ISOs to an old 512MB USB I had. The only “negative” is that there wasn’t room left for the ISOs I wanted. 90MB x 4 = 360MB. It adds syslinux stuff. Anyways, at least I can use a very old USB.
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openSUSE on GNOME.Asia 2015

May 27th, 2015 by

On 7-9 May 2015, Gnu/Linux Bogor (GLIB) in collaboration with the Faculty of Computer Science, University of Indonesia (Fasilkom UI) organized GNOME.Asia Summit 2015 at the Hall of the University of Indonesia, Depok. GNOME.Asia Summit 2015 is the eighth edition of the conference. According to the local committee this event attracted more than 322, users, developers, business professionals, media, students and government officials, including 48 speakers from all over the world. (http://2015.gnome.asia)

gnome-asia-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many thanks to openSUSE/SUSE who willing to become one of the sponsor for this event. I organized some friends from Indonesia openSUSE community to make an openSUSE booth. We prepare several PC and RasPi for some demo and displaying openSUSE 13.2. I really appreciate the help from Andi Sugandi, Yan Arief Purwanto, and Adnan Kurniawan for their time in this event. Joey Li from SUSE Taiwan, Max Huang from Taiwan openSUSE community and Bin Li from China openSUSE community, also came and joint us on the event.

gnome-asia-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During 2 days (May 8-9) of the event our booth always full of visitor. They asked many questions regarding openSUSE and we tried to answer it directly as we can. We distributed around 200 DVD (openSUSE 13.2 x86_64) and stickers. We also make a short quiz/questionnaire and the top 30 people with highest answer will get a nice looking t-shirt on the 2nd day :-)

On the 2nd day me and Joey Li were also give talk. My presentation is Linux for Basic Education, Is it Feasible?”, while Joey Li is talking about Signature Verification of Hibernate Snapshot”

gnome-asia-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to wonderful people of openSUSE and GNOME, and finally some happy face with openSUSE t-shirt!

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More photos can be seen on GNOME.Asia 2015 Flickr Group

Install ddclient on your openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 25th, 2015 by

We’ve seen two Dynamic DNS clients. We’ll see another one here.

1. First of all, install the program.

$ zypper in ddclient

2. Create the confing file

$ nano /etc/ddclient.conf

with the following content

daemon=5m
timeout=10
syslog=no # log update msgs to syslog
#mail=root # mail all msgs to root
#mail-failure=root # mail failed update msgs to root
pid=/var/run/ddclient.pid # record PID in file.
ssl=yes # use ssl-support. Works with
# ssl-library

use=if, if=eth0
server=freedns.afraid.org
protocol=freedns
login=login_name
password=the_password
somedomain.mooo.com

Change the ones that are in bold letters.

3. Start the service

$ systemctl enable ddclient

Reboot

Upgrade your openSUSE Raspberry Pi from 13.1 to 13.2

May 24th, 2015 by

We’ve seen how to create an SD card. I used the 13.1 version. The wiki page https://en.opensuse.org/HCL:Raspberry_Pi is not very clear (to me) about resize partitions. So I tried to upgrade the version 13.1. Here what I did.

1. Check if the update repository already exists and is enabled.

$ zypper repos –uri

You should have the following enabled

3 | openSUSE-13.1-repo-update | openSUSE-13.1-repo-update | Yes | Yes | http://download.opensuse.org/ports/update/13.1/

If not, then add it

$ zypper addrepo –check –refresh –name ‘openSUSE-13.1-Update’ http://download.opensuse.org/update/13.1/ repo-update

2. Refresh and update your system

$ zypper ref && zypper update

3. Remove all third party/OBS repos you no longer need.

$ zypper lr

# Remove with

$ zypper rr (alias or number)

4. Change all remaining repo URLs to the new version of the distribution (needs to be run as root).

$ cp -Rv /etc/zypp/repos.d /etc/zypp/repos.d.Old

5. Change the repos.

$ sed -i ‘s/13\.1/13.2/g’ /etc/zypp/repos.d/*

6. Refresh new repositories (you might be asked to accept new gpg key)

$ zypper ref

If you haven’t removed third party/OBS repositories you may encounter some errors as these repositories may not exist yet or they may have different unguessable URL. It is always recommended to remove them and add their newer version after upgrade.

7. Upgrade

$ zypper dup

Now you have to wait. Reboot at the end, just to be sure that everything went smooth.

Run copy.com on your openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 23rd, 2015 by

A good question is why do you want to sync a folder on your Raspberry Pi with a cloud service. The answer is little complicated. It’s a subproject that I’m working on right now. I want to upload some data I’ll create on a Raspberry Pi (with limited size of SD card). The uploaded data will be saved on other computer and the SD will be clear again to create new data.

The cloud service I prefer is always ownCloud.
Here I used http://www.copy.com. It provides 15GB of disk but you can increase it.

First of all download the file

$ wget http://copy.com/install/linux/Copy.tgz

Then extract it

$ tar xzvf Copy* copy/armv6h/

This will create a folder called “copy,” and in it there will be three sub-folders: “armv6h,” “x86,” and “x86_64.” The first one contains the Copy client binaries for the Raspberry Pi, the second contains the Copy client for 32-bit Linux on a PC, and the third the same client but for 64-bit Linux PCs.

$ cd /copy/armv6h

Now there are 2 ways of using copy. The CopyCmd tool and CopyConsole.

CopyCmd

List of the directories

$ ./CopyCmd Cloud -username=user@gmail.com -password=’mypass’ ls

Upload all content of local /home/user/directory/ to remote /directory

$ ./CopyCmd Cloud -username=user@gmail.com -password=’mypass’ put -r /home/user/directory/ /directory

CopyConsole

The CopyConsole tool keeps a folder on your Raspberry Pi synchronized with the data on Copy.com.
The sync app runs in the background and is started like this:

$ ./CopyConsole -daemon -username=user@gmail.com -password=’mypass’ -root=/home/user/directory

This will sync the local /home/user/directory to copy.com. If you delete something from there, it’ll delete from local folder as well.

Remeber to run this command everytime you restart your pi. It’s better to run it manually because there is username and password that are personal (unless you created an account just for your raspberry pi).

Make your openSUSE Raspberry Pi a seedbox

May 22nd, 2015 by

Raspberry Pi is a quite slow ARM board, compared to other boards. Even if you compare Raspberry Pi B+ against Raspberry Pi 2. So maybe one of the best use of RasPi is to make it seedbox. Let’s say you’re at the office and a friend tells you to test a distro. You can login to your home Raspberry Pi seedbox and add the torrent file there.

Here I will show you how to setup Transmission, vftpd and suggestions for Android programs.
First of all, download and create the openSUSE SD card (resize your SD card to full size or you can mount the extra size as extra partition. Since it’s not something important, then you can use full size of your SD card).
Then setup the dynamic dns service (see previous posts).
Finally set a static IP (to use it with port forward of your router).

INSTALL TRANSMISSION

First install transmission:

$ zypper in transmission transmission-daemon

Create 2 folders for incomplete torrents and completed torrents:

$ mkdir -p /torrents/incomplete && mkdir /torrents/complete

Configure proper permissions for transmission:

$ chgrp transmission /torrents/incomplete
$ chgrp transmission /torrents/complete
$ chmod 770 /torrents/incomplete
$ chmod 777 /torrents/complete

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Set static IP on your openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 21st, 2015 by

To set a static IP in Debian based distros is easy. Just change a file (/etc/network/interfaces).
In openSUSE is easier. Everything can be done under YaST.

1. Open YaST and go to Network Devices>Network Settings.

2. Then choose Statically Assigned IP Address (move with tab button and click on space button). Give the static IP you want and as Subnet Mask, 255.255.255.0. Press Next (press enter).

3. You’ll see an overview of the ethernet card.

4. Go to Hostname/DNS and add Google’s DNS servers (optional).

5. Next, go to Routing and add your router ip (usually 192.168.1.1).

Now press OK, reboot and try to login again with SSH.

inadyn and openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 20th, 2015 by

We’ve seen how to install no-ip.
Fortunately, there’s not only this service but other services too. Just for reference, here are some (not only free):

http://www.dyndns.org
http://freedns.afraid.org
http://www.zoneedit.com
http://www.no-ip.com
http://www.easydns.com
http://www.tzo.com
http://www.3322.org
http://www.dnsomatic.com
http://www.tunnelbroker.net
http://dns.he.net/
http://www.dynsip.org
http://www.sitelutions.com
http://www.dnsexit.com
http://www.changeip.com
http://www.zerigo.com
http://www.dhis.org
https://nsupdate.info
http://duckdns.org
https://www.loopia.com
https://www.namecheap.com
https://domains.google.com
https://www.ovh.com
https://www.dtdns.com
http://giradns.com

Let’s see one of them https://freedns.afraid.org. After you register, go to Dynamic DNS link (on the left top box-for members).
Add your host with type A and subdomain and domain what you like as host.

Now there’s going to be a list of your host names. Right click on the Direct Link and copy the link. You should keep the alpha-numeric key. The address will be something like http://freedns.afraid.org/dynamic/update.php?[alpha-numeric-key]

Now it’s time to install the client. I’ve found it from https://github.com/troglobit/inadyn.

1. First of all, install the needed programs to build the service.

$ zypper in gcc-c++ gcc git libopenssl-devel make nano

2. Then

$ mkdir inadyn

$ cd inadyn

3. Download the program from ftp://troglobit.com/inadyn/

$ wget ftp://troglobit.com/inadyn/inadyn-1.99.9.tar.xz

and decompress it

$ tar xvfJ inadyn-1.99.9.tar.xz

4. Go to the directory

$ cd inadyn-1.99.9

5. Compile and install

$ make

$ make install

6. Create the confing file

$ nano /etc/inadyn.conf

with the following content

--username USERNAME
--password PASSWORD
--update_period 3600
--forced_update_period 14400
--alias HOSTNAME,alphanumeric key
--background
--dyndns_system default@freedns.afraid.org
--syslog

The bold words are the ones you should change. Remember the alphanumeric key is the one you got from right click on the Direct Link.

7. Start the client. Create the service file.

$ nano /usr/lib/systemd/system/inadyn.service

8. Add the following content.

[Unit]
Description=inadyn Dynamic DNS Update Client
After=network.target

[Service]
Type=forking
ExecStart=/usr/local/sbin/inadyn

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

9. Start the service

$ systemctl start inadyn.service

and enable the service

$ systemctl enable inadyn.service

10. Reboot and check if the service is running.

$ ps -A | grep inadyn

you should get results something like:

1526 ? 00:00:00 inadyn

no-ip and openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 19th, 2015 by

We’ve seen how to install openSUSE image on the SD card.
Next step is to be sure that we can have access from outside our house (since most of the times, Raspberry Pi is located at home).

To do that we use Dynamic DNS services. A free service (so far) is No-IP. Most of the routers support it. You can use your router’s service. But what if you want 2 different host names on the same IP? Let’s say you have different ARM boards on the same router or you have a server etc.

1. First of all, install the needed programs to build the service (same as I did with ZNC)

zypper in gcc-c++ gcc git libopenssl-devel make nano

2. Then

mkdir noip

cd noip

3. Download the program

wget http://www.no-ip.com/client/linux/noip-duc-linux.tar.gz

and decompress it

tar vzxf noip-duc-linux.tar.gz

4. Go to the directory

cd noip-2.1.9-1

5. Compile and install

make

make install

While it install’s the software you will prompted to enter the username & password. Once that is done it will ask you teh refresh interval … leave it.. to have the default value. You are required to answer some more questions … just ans NO an d you should be good to go.

6. Start the client

/usr/local/bin/noip2

To check if the service is running, use the command:

/usr/local/bin/noip2 -S

and the results should be like

1 noip2 process active.

Process 1516, started as noip2, (version 2.1.9)
Using configuration from /usr/local/etc/no-ip2.conf
Last IP Address set EXTERNAL IP
Account USERNAME
configured for:
host HOSTNAME
Updating every 30 minutes via /dev/eth0 with NAT enabled.

Auto start the client on reboot

But what if you reboot? You want to start the client everytime you reboot. This can be done with systemd.

1. Create the service file.

nano /usr/lib/systemd/system/noip.service

2. Add the following content.

[Unit]
Description=No-IP Dynamic DNS Update Client
After=network.target

[Service]
Type=forking
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/noip2

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

3. Start the service

systemctl start noip.service

and enable the service

systemctl enable noip.service

Create an SD card for your Raspberry Pi B and B+

May 18th, 2015 by

Most of the projects around the Internet use Raspbian as main Raspberry Pi distro. Unfortunately, Raspbian doesn’t work for me. Minibian worked. So I serched other distros. My favourite is Arch Linux because there are plenty of programs that I need for projects, but it needs some extra steps from terminal to create the SD.

Here we’ll see how to create an SD card of openSUSE. There are plenty of information at the wiki page https://en.opensuse.org/HCL:Raspberry_Pi
. I’ll collect the information I need for projects, I’ll write next.

I used 13.1 as distro because it’s easier for me to resize the SD card.

1. Download the image (openSUSE-13.1-ARM-JeOS-raspberrypi.armv7l.raw.xz) from here:

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/devel:/ARM:/13.1:/Contrib:/RaspberryPi/images/

decompress the image.

2. Find the device name of your card

cat /proc/partitions

usually it’s going to be /dev/mmcblk0.

and create the card (as root)

sudo dd if=openSUSE-13.1*.raw.xz of=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=4M;sync

3. Since I didn’t use a monitor (HDMI or DVI), I had to do some extra steps before boot my raspberry pi.

a. Delete the file /var/lib/YaST2/reconfig_system to start headless.
b. Resize the ext4 partition with Gparted.

4. When boot the Raspberry Pi, use the following

ssh root@IP

user: root
password: linux

Now the first command will be

zypper ref

and then update

zypper up