Home Home
Sign up | Login

Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 80

July 19th, 2019 by

After our (really long) sprint report, which featured information from 3 different sprints together, we are back to our regular schedule of publishing a blog post after each sprint.

In a nutshell, these are the highlights from the previous one:

  • A new version of yast2-network will be submitted to Tumbleweed shortly, including quite some internal changes as part of the refactoring effort.
  • The support for offline installation of SUSE Linux Enterprise products has been improved to handle modules and extensions dependencies automatically, among other goodies.
  • The partitioning proposal has been adapted to support SUSE Manager special needs.
  • The guided partitioning ignores now the adjust_by_ram parameter in IBM z Systems, where it is basically useless.
  • Some (open)SUSE 15 features have been backported to 5th Service Pack of SUSE Linux Enterprise.

And last but not least, we have some words to say about the feedback we get from you (that we really appreciate!) and the future of YaST.

Shipping Another Round of Network Refactored Code

One of the problems we wanted to avoid while refactoring yast2-network is diverging too much from the version shipped in Tumbleweed. As we mentioned in our last report, we have done quite some work, especially when it comes to the internals of the user interface, and codebases are starting to look quite different.

For that reason, we decided to merge the new code into the master branch so it can be included in Tumbleweed shortly. We are talking about a pull request which contains more than 340 commits, adds 9000 lines, removes 5000 and modifies 197 files. So, what could possibly go wrong? To be honest we did quite some testing but there is a chance that you can find some issues. In that case, please, open a bug report and we will happily fix it.

About the technical details, we put most of our efforts into drawing a clear line between the user interface and the business logic. In parallel, we are still working on the new data model which enables us to read/write the network configuration using different backends, although at this time we are only supporting sysconfig. We have made some progress during this sprint (you can check the pull request if you are interested), but we will not merge this code into our master branch yet. You can find more details in the updated documentation.

After reading this status update about the yast2-network refactoring, you might be wondering about our plans. Basically, we would like to finish the support to read/write network interfaces configuration and start using it through all the code, killing some rather old and buggy modules like LanItems.

Offline Media Support

For SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 products, there are two installation media:

  • The installer media, which contains only basic packages for a minimal system.
  • The so-called Packages DVD, which contains several modules and extensions, like the Development Tools Module or the Server Application Module.

The main use case of the Packages DVD is allowing to install the systems without an Internet connection. However, YaST support for such a scenario is pretty simplistic. For instance, dependencies between modules are not evaluated and the user has to select them manually. This approach is error-prone and user-unfriendly.

Fortunately, these shortcomings will be addressed in SLE 15 SP2. YaST is now able to solve modules and extensions dependencies, so the user does not have to worry about them anymore. For instance, if you select the Web and Scripting Module, the Basesystem Module and Server Application Module will be automatically selected.

At first, solving dependencies through the 25 repositories which are included in the Packages DVD might be time-consuming, but the current implementation takes advantage of libsolv to reduce it to about 2 seconds in our testing machine.

Improved Extensions and Modules Selection

Additionally, other improvements have been included, like displaying additional information about each module/extension or filtering out base products from the list.

SUSE Manager and the Partitioning Guided Setup

As you know, YaST is a very flexible Linux installer. The creators of each (open)SUSE product or role can define the particular sequence of steps presented to the user and configure many of the options on each of those step. But that was still not enough for the maintainers of SUSE Manager, the purpose-specific distribution to manage software-defined infrastructures.

SUSE Manager follows a pretty specific approach regarding the management of the storage devices. So we had to add some extra configuration options to our partitioning guided proposal to fulfill their needs. We felt the topic deserved its own separate blog post. So follow the link and enjoy the love story of SUSE Manager and the Partitioning Guided Setup.

Taking care of IBM z Systems

For many reasons, IBM z System architecture (s390) is one of those special cases where YaST flexibility is crucial. One of the many options that YaST offers to products and roles creators is called adjust_by_ram, which instructs YaST to make sure that a given volume size is, at least, as big as the RAM of the system. Obviously, this option is especially useful for the swap volume when we want to be able to suspend the system to disk.

However, on the 64-bits s390 architecture, resuming from a swap device is not supported, which renders this option useless. For that reason, YaST will take this situation into account, and it will not enlarge the swap volume bye default for s390 machines, even if adjust_by_ram was set in the control file. Of course, the user will be able to enlarge the volume by activating the corresponding checkbox in the Guided Setup options.

Guided Partitioning Filesystem Options

Backporting Stuff to SLE 12 SP5

Although most of the development effort is focused on SLE 15 SP2 and openSUSE Leap 15.2, we do not forget about SLE 12. SUSE is working on the 5th Service Pack of this release and the YaST team is no exception.

During this sprint, SLE 12 got two interesting features that were backported from SLE 15. The first one is the ability to specify kernel mitigations settings, as you already can do in Tumbleweed. And the second one is the support for PMEM devices, that you can see in the screenshot below.

YaST2 Partitioner PMEM Support

Recently, there was an interesting discussion about the openSUSE installer on Reddit, continued as a thread on our yast-devel mailing list.

This is just a quick heads-up to confirm that we hear you. Some of the issues discussed there were already known to be sore points, some others may need more clarification on why and how things are as they are.

We are taking your feedback and criticism seriously. But we also have to consider all the requirements, and we try to avoid making unrealistic promises. So please bear with us until we had some further discussions first about what we can do and in what time frame.

Conclusions

In addition to what we have described in this report, we have been working on fixing bugs and making other small improvements here and there. And sprint 81th will not be different: part of the team will keep working on yast2-network while the rest squashes as many bugs as possible.

SUSE Manager and the Partitioning Guided Setup

July 16th, 2019 by

Apart from our usual development sprint reports, we (the YaST Team) sometimes publish separate blog posts to summarize a new feature or to present an idea we are working on. Lately, several of those posts have been focused on new features of the YaST Partitioner, like the support for Bcache or the new Btrfs capabilities. But today it’s the turn of another part of yast2-storage-ng: the partitioning proposal, also known as the Guided Setup.

As you may know, YaST is an universal installer used to configure all the (open)SUSE and derivative products. Moreover, the installer options and steps can be refined even further by each of the system roles available for each product. The goal of this blog post is to present some ideas aimed to add new possibilities in the area of the storage guided proposal for those who configure the installer for a certain product or system role. With that we hope to ease the life for the creators of SUSE Manager, the SUSE’s purpose-specific distribution to manage software-defined infrastructures.

Although many of the presented capabilities will land soon in openSUSE Tumbleweed they will not be used by default. Not only because they are not targeted to the openSUSE use-case, but also because so far this is just a prototype. That means all texts are subject to change and most screens will get some adaptations before being used in a final product… or maybe they will even be completely revamped.

One Guided Proposal to Rule them All

Although the Expert Partitioner can be used to tweak the storage configuration of any SUSE or openSUSE distribution during installation, the installer always tries to offer a reasonable proposal about it. Moreover, the “Guided Setup” button in the “Suggested Partitioning” screen leads to a wizard that can be used to configure some aspects of such a proposal, as shown in the following diagram (some actions have been blurred just to emphasize the fact that the concrete list of actions will change after each execution of the wizard).

Default Guided Setup wizard

The exact behavior of the Guided Setup is different in every product and, potentially, in every system role. Many things can be adjusted by the creators of the product or the role, like the partitions and LVM volumes to be proposed, the options to be offered in the wizard, the default value for every option and much more. But all those possibilities were still not enough in the case of SUSE Manager and its unique approach to organize the storage devices.

The Strange Case of SUSE Manager

First of all, the SUSE Manager documentation suggests to allocate each of several data directories (/var/spacewalk, /var/lib/pgsql, /var/cache and /srv) in its own dedicated disk when installing in a production environment. For such setup to make sense, it’s absolutely crucial to choose the right disk for every data directory taking into account both the size and the speed of the disks.

The documentation also suggests to use LVM in production environments. In order to achieve a clear separation of disks when using LVM, the recommended approach is to set up a separate LVM volume group for each relevant data directory instead of allocating all the logical volumes in the usual single shared “system” group.

So, although it may look overkill when installing SUSE Manager just for evaluation purposes, the preferred setup for a final deployment of the product spreads over up to five disks – one containing an LVM volume group with the usual logical volumes of any Linux system (like the root system and the swap space) and each of the other disks containing additional LVM groups, each one dedicated to a particular data directory.

Last but not least, the SUSE Manager guided setup should never offer the possibility of keeping the preexisting partitions in any of the disks. So the usual questions “Choose what to do with existing Linux/Windows/other partitions” (see the image above) should not even be displayed to the user. The answer is always “remove even if not needed”. Period. ­čśë

Breaking Down the Problem into Smaller Pieces

We didn’t want to implement a completely different guided proposal for SUSE Manager. Instead, we wanted to merge the main ideas behind its approach into the current configurable system, so other products and roles could use them. We identified three different features that we turned into the corresponding optional configuration settings at disposal of anyone defining a new system role. All the new settings are independent of each other and can be combined in any way to provide a fully customized user experience.

First Piece: Explicit Selection of Disks per Volume

First of all, it was necessary to support letting the user explicitly choose a disk for every partition or LVM volume, unlike the default guided setup which automatically finds the best disk to allocate every partition given the requirements and a set of “candidate disks”. To enable that, now the product or role can choose between two values for the new allocate_volume_mode setting. A value of auto (which is the default to keep backwards compatibility) will result in the already known wizard with up to 4 steps.

  • Select the candidate disks
  • Decide what to do with existing partitions
  • Configure the schema (LVM and/or encryption)
  • Configure each file system

As always, the steps in which there is nothing for the user to decide are skipped so the wizard is usually shorter than four steps.

No surprises so far. But allocate_volume_mode can also be set to device, which will result in the alternative wizard displayed in the following image.

New possible Guided Setup wizard

As you can see, there is no initial step to select the set of disks to be used by the system to automatically allocate the needed partitions. Instead, the following screen allows to explicitly assign a disk to every partition or LVM volume group.

New step to assign volumes and partitions to disks

Second Piece: Enforcing a Behavior about Previous Partitions

No matter which allocate mode is configured (auto or device), there is always one step in which the user is asked what to do with the preexisting partitions in the affected disks. So far, the product defined the default answer for those questions, but the user always had the opportunity to change that default option.

Now, the creator of the product or the system role can disable the setting called delete_resize_configurable which is enabled by default in order to prevent the user from modifying the default behavior. The wizard will include no questions about what to do with existing Windows/Linux/other partitions. In most cases, that will imply a whole step of the wizard to be simply skipped.

Third Piece: Separate Volume Groups for some Directories

The most important setting configured by every system role is the list of so-called volumes. That list includes all the file systems (both mandatory and optional ones) that the guided setup should create as separate partitions or LVM logical volumes. Now it’s possible to specify that a volume could be created in its very own separate LVM volume group using the new attribute separate_vg_name. If any of the volumes defined for the current product and role contains such attribute, the screen for selecting the schema will contain an extra checkbox below the usual LVM-related one.

New checkbox for directories into their own separate LVM

Putting the Pieces Together for SUSE Manager

With all the above, we expanded the toolbox for anyone wanting to configure the (open)SUSE installation experience. Which means now we can fulfill the requirements of SUSE Manager maintainers by just adding separate_vg_name to some volumes, setting delete_resize_configurable to false and adjusting the allocate_volume_mode. With all that, the new SUSE Manager workflow for the guided setup will look like this.

First of all, the user will be able to specify the creation of separate LVM volume groups as suggested in the product documentation.

SUSE Manager setup - first screen

Then a second screen to select which separate file systems should be created and to fine-tune the options for every one of them, if any.

SUSE Manager setup - second screen

And finally a last step to assign the correct disk for every partition or separate volume group, depending on the selections on previous screens. With this step the user can optimize the performance by distributing the disks as explained in the SUSE Manager documentation, allocating the areas that need intensive processing to the faster disks and the greedy directories to the bigger devices.

SUSE Manager setup - third screen

As usual, the list of actions will reflect the selections of the user creating as many LVM structures as requested.

SUSE Manager setup - result

Beyond SUSE Manager

As already mentioned, all the guided proposal features can be combined within a given product in any way. For example, one product could adopt the approach of creating separate LVM volume groups while still sticking to the traditional auto allocate mode. Or a given system role could enforce to never delete any existing partition without allowing the user to change that.

But beyond the “Guided Setup” button, the availability of two different allocate modes brings back one idea that has been floating around since the introduction of Storage-ng – adding a section “Wizards” to the Expert Partitioner. That would allow to combine some manual steps with the execution of any of the two available allocate modes of the guided proposal… or with any other workflow that can be implemented in the future.

As always, we are looking forward any feedback about the new features or the guided partitioning proposal in general. And stay tuned for more news!

Highlights of the Latest YaST Development Sprints

June 25th, 2019 by

May and June have been, so far, interesting months for the YaST Team. We worked hard to polish the last details of the recently released openSUSE Leap 15.1, we attended the openSUSE Conference 2019 (with many fruitful conversations), we shared quite some time together around a table without computers (most of the time, we are a geographically distributed team), many team members enjoyed vacations (it’s spring time in Europe), we organized a Leap 15.1 launch party with technical talks in Gran Canaria… and we ran out of energy to also publish our traditional sprint reports in this blog.

We will try to fix that with this blog post in which we will try to summarize some highlights from the latest three development sprints, namely the 77th, 78th and 79th. So be warned, this is going to be a loooong post.

Support for Multi-device Btrfs File Systems

We have been working steadily during the three sprints in implementing all the necessary bits to offer a good experience installing and upgrading an (open)SUSE system on top of several block devices by means of Btrfs RAID capabilities. That includes support in the Partitioner, in AutoYaST, in the storage guided setup and more.

We decided that all that deserved a separate blog post. You can find here: Getting Further with Btrfs in YaST.

More Improvements for the Partitioner

That blog post mentions a couple of changes in the Partitioner that, although initially motivated by the introduction of multi-device Btrfs, go beyond that scope and are aimed to make the all the lists of devices more useful and informative.

Traditionally the Partitioner used two separate columns “Type” and “FS Type” to describe the function of every device. That was sometimes hard to understand. Moreover, quite often the important information (like the relationship between a partition and its RAID or LVM) was simply missing in those tables.

Traditional devices table in the Partitioner

We have merged those columns into a more informative one that identifies the devices and also gives an overview of the relationship between them at first glance. In addition, the table displaying all the system devices now includes multi-device file systems.

Revamped table of devices

Mitigating CPU vulnerabilities from YaST

If you are interested in security (or simply if you have not been living under a rock) you probably have heard about CPU based attacks like Spectre or Meltdown. The last year has seen a number of these CPU issues, all of them coming along with their own kernel options to change the Linux behavior in order to mitigate the security risks at a price of some performance loss.

However, not all users know what affects their architectures or particular models of CPU and which kernel parameters to use to gain more performance if the security risk is acceptable for them.

For that purpose, a new meta-option called “mitigations” was added to the Linux kernel. It allows to enable and disable at once several of those mitigations that prevent CPU attacks. See more information at this document published by SUSE.

We find that kernel option very useful, so we decided to provide an easy way for users to adjust it. Now the YaST bootloader screen contains a new setting which offers three pre-defined options and even a fourth one to let the users fine-tune the settings on their own. As you can see in the screenshot below, we have included extensive documentation in the help dialog, so you will not need to search for this blog post in the future.

It is also possible to modify this option directly from the installation summary. For that purpose, the “Firewall” section was renamed to “Security” and it now includes the possibility to tweak the CPU mitigation options, alongside the traditional settings for firewall and opening the SSH port.

CPU mitigations in the installation summary

Another success story of (open)SUSE offering a promptly solution for our users to easily adapt their systems to ever-changing complex needs.

Memory Optimizations during Installation

While the release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 was approaching, we got several bug reports stating the YaST installer used to freeze when using only 1GB RAM with online repositories (see bug#1136051).

It turned out that at some point YaST loads the details of all available packages. And that needs a lot of memory if you enable the online repositories during installation. For example the OSS Leap repository contains more than 35.000 binary packages!

The problem was in the YaST internal API accessing the package manager library (libzypp). It did not allow to filter the objects, YaST had to read all objects and then do the filtering in the code. And for each object it returned all attributes, even those which were not needed (like the package description, full RPM name, etc…). All that data required a lot of memory.

To fix that we have introduced new API calls that allow specifying more filters (like return all selected packages, packages from specific repository,…) and you can set which attributes should be returned. If you need to know only the name and the version then you will not get the other useless attributes. And to ease the usage of the new API in YaST we provided a nice object oriented wrapper written in Ruby.

This optimization saves a lot of memory, 1GB of RAM should be enough for future installations with the online repositories, even if they grow even more.

Unfortunately, we were only able to diagnose the problem and provide a solution a couple of weeks before the official release of Leap 15.1. Introducing a change in such a sensitive part of the installer was considered too risky (it would have invalidated many of the tests that had been already performed) so the installer included in openSUSE Leap 15.1 is still memory hungry if online repositories are used. For that release, we simply increased the official memory requirements to 1.5 GiB.

Online Migration from openSUSE Leap 15.1 to SLES15-SP1

For openSUSE Leap 15.0 it was only possible to migrate from Leap to SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) manually (see the documentation). With Leap 15.1 the goal was to also support a migration using YaST. But we got a bug report saying the online migration from openSUSE Leap 15.1 to SLES15-SP1 displayed a wrong migration summary and didn’t work well.

It turned out that YaST needed some small fixes to support this properly. The main problem was that YaST did not expect that the base product or the package vendor can be changed during online migration, so far it was only possible to upgrade to the next SLE service pack level. But that is fixed now.

Wanna try the migration from openSUSE Leap 15.1 to SLES15-SP1? Then follow these steps.

  1. Install the yast2-registration and yast2-migration packages in the Leap 15.1 installation
  2. Make sure the latest online updates are installed (to install the fixes mentioned above)
  3. Start the YaST registration module and register the openSUSE Leap 15.1 product using your registration key
  4. Then start the YaST migration module, select the migration to SLES15-SP1
  5. (There might be reported some package dependency issues in the migration summary, go to the package manager and resolve them. Usually removing the old openSUSE package is the right solution.)
  6. Start the migration, the SLES packages will be downloaded and installed
  7. At the end the system will be rebooted to start the freshly installed SLES, enjoy! ­čÖé
  8. (It is recommended to review the orphaned packages, leftovers from the Leap installation, with the command zypper packages --orphaned and possibly remove them.)

From Leap to SLES via YaST

Please note that only minimal server installations of Leap are supported for upgrade, full installations especially with third party packages might not work correctly.

Why Cannot I Read the Logs?

Long time ago, the logs of any Linux system were spread over several files living under the /var/log subdirectory. YaST offers its “System Log” module to inspect those files in a convenient way. Since the introduction of Systemd and its journal, that information has been gradually moved to this new mechanism by default. And YaST offers its “Systemd Journal” module to inspect and query that journal.

Both YaST modules can be executed by any user in the system, not only by root. That’s intentional because both the Systemd journal and the traditional Linux log files can register information targeted to unprivileged users. But there was some room for improvement in the error message displayed by both modules when such users were trying to access to protected information.

This is how the new more explanatory message looks in the “System Log” module.

Explanatory pop-up for log viewer

And this is the extended message for “Systemd Journal”, that now mentions the systemd-journal user’s group.

Improved message in the journal viewer

Another Day at the YaST Office: Adapting to Changes

As we usually remark in our blog posts, a significant part of the work of the YaST Team consist in keeping YaST in sync with the constant changes in the underlying system. Of course, these sprints were not an exception in that regard. Without trying to do an exhaustive list, let’s take a look to some of those adaptations since the mentioned underlying changes may be interesting for some readers.

Turns out Systemd developers has decided to change the list of possible states for Systemd services. The systemd-sigabrt state is obsolete and a new systemd-watchdog one was added. In the YaST team we learned some time ago that the list of Systemd states changes more often than what most people would expect. As a consequence we have an automated check to detect these situations. The bell ringed, we adapted the code and everything keeps working.

Systemd is not the only technology that keeps evolving. Quite some time ago, RMT replaced SMT as the default proxy technologies for the SUSE Customer Center. Although both has coexisted for quite some time, from SLE-15 onward only RMT is offered. Thus we have adapted all the references to SMT that still existed in YaST. From now on, only RMT is mentioned to avoid confusion.

Another common adaptation we have to perform in YaST is adjusting some module when the output of the command it runs under the hood has changed. Recently we found out the developers of the command iscsiadm has decided to use more than one exit code to indicate a successful execution (traditionally, only zero should mean that). After a long discussion, we decided to adapt YaST iSCSI to also be happy with the error code 21. What means for you? That future versions of YaST iSCSI should work faster in some situations, since the confusion will not longer result in a timeout.

YaST Firstboot: a Better Example File

Those were just some example of the many adaptations we did lately for changes in the system. But not all adjustments are motivated by external changes. We also realized the example configuration file provided by YaST Firstboot (at /etc/YaST2/firstboot.xml) needed some love. Due to the nature of YaST Firstboot, that file should be customized before using YaST Firstboot. But providing an example file with three different steps about acceptance of licenses (two of them enabled and the third one disabled) and other inconsistencies was definitely not helping anyone to understand how to use the module.

In fact, the status of that default example configuration and of the documentation managed to confuse even SUSE’s quality assurance team. So we improved the example file shipped in the package to make it more realistic and we also updated the YaST Firstboot documentation to clarify how to use that file. Because not all improvements are always done by coding.

Leap 15.1’s Most Annoying Bug: Create Home as Btrfs Subvolume

As all openSUSE users should know, for every Leap release a page is created in the openSUSE wiki listing the so-called Most Annoying Bugs. Leap 15.1 was a very smooth release and this time the corresponding list contains only one bug… and it’s a YaST one. ­čÖü

In an installed system, when YaST was creating a new user it was always trying to create its home directory as a Btrfs subvolume. Even in cases in which that was impossible. For example, if the directory to be created was not in a Btrfs file system.

Writing user error

Fortunately, the bug didn’t affect the installation process or AutoYaST. We created a fix that was quickly available as a maintenance update. So make sure your openSUSE system is updated before trying to create new users with YaST.

YaST Network refactoring: status report

Since we submitted the first bits of the yast2-network refactoring by the end of April, we have made quite some progress in this area. Although it is still an ongoing effort, we would like you to give you an update on the current state.

We might say that we have been working on two different areas the user interface implementation and the future data model.

About the user interface, the team has improved the code quite a lot to make it easier to maintain and extend. We have introduced some classes to de-couple the widgets from the data, and it pays off. Additionally, we have fixed some bugs (many of them related to validations), simplified the process of adding new devices and reorganized the hardware tab.

New hardware tab in YaST Network

Regarding the internal data model, we have been thinking about the best way to represent network configuration in an agnostic way so, in the future, we can not only support Wicked but other options too (for the time being, the NetworkManager support is quite limited). If you are curious about the details, we have added a document describing the approach to the repository.

The new data model is already being used to handle DNS and Routing configuration. So if you are using Tumbleweed you have been already using the new network code for some weeks, including the UI enhancements presented in our latest post.

New network routing dialog

Although the data model is so far only used in the mentioned parts, the plan is to submit to Tumbleweed a heavily refactored UI layer during next sprint. So stay tuned.

Added Appstream Metadata to the YaST Packages

The YaST package manager is not the only software manager in the (open)SUSE distributions. There are some more, like Discover in KDE or the GNOME software manager, not to mention the online openSUSE appstore.

While the YaST manager is package oriented, those other software managers are application oriented. That makes a huge difference, especially for the beginner users.

The full list of packages does not only include the applications (basically anything a user can start from the desktop), but also shared libraries, pieces that provide functionality for other applications or basic components needed for the system to work. With so many software packages (the openSUSE OSS repository contains over 35.000 of them!) it’s sometimes hard to find the software you need unless you know what you are looking for.

To offer an application-oriented view on top of all that, the application managers need some special data describing the applications inside the packages. The data are located in the /usr/share/metainfo/*.xml files, if you are interested in the technical details check the AppStream documentation provided by the Freedesktop.org.

Our absolutely awesome community contributor Stasiek Michalski (more famous by his nickname lcp) realized YaST was not offered in those application managers and decided to fix it. So he created an XML generator which collects the data from YaST packages and automagically generates the metainfo XML file needed by the other software managers.

YaST in GNOME Software

As a result, the Gnome Software Manager, Discover and other software managers will offer YaST in Tumbleweed just as any user-oriented application. Thanks lcp!

YaST in Discover

AutoYaST Pre-install Scripts & Storage

AutoYaST has a special feature to allow users to customize the installation process and take control in different stages of the installation. For that, the AutoYaST profile offers a section where you can insert your custom scripts. There are four types of scripts: pre-scripts, postpartitioning-scripts, chroot-scripts, post-scripts and init-scripts.

For the particular case of pre-scripts, the documentation states that “It is also possible to change the partitioning in your pre-script“. That means, for example, you could use a script to create a new partition or to configure some kind of technology. Therefore, it would be very convenient to re-analyze the storage devices after running the user pre-scripts. In fact, that was the default behavior in the old storage stack, but the new one was slightly modified to only re-analyze the system under certain conditions.

But turns out some SLE customers were using pre-scripts to configure the behavior of multipath and those changes were not being noticed by AutoYaST.

The solution was quite trivial. We simply decided to always perform a new storage re-analysis after the AutoYaST pre-scripts. We did not find strong reasons to not do it and there should not be significant performance penalty.

And, for the specific case of multipath, YaST now copies some configuration files (e.g., /etc/multipath.conf and /etc/multipath/bindings) to the target system when performing a new installation. Otherwise, the installed system would not contain the configuration applied during the installation.

Clarifying the Usage of Software Management Options

Our software manager is one of the most complex YaST modules, which makes some aspects of its usage not fully obvious for some users. You may have even notice that is the only YaST module in which the interface is clearly different when executed in text and graphical mode. Specially the menu at the top of the interface, which is organized in different sections.

Some users where confused by the fact of some options not being persisted between different executions of the module. Those options are there to modify the current operation of the module, not to change the configuration of package management in the system.

When executed in text mode that was clear because such options where labeled as “temporary change” but the graphical mode didn’t have any indication about it. As you can see in the following screenshot, that’s fixed now.

Temporary options in YaST Software

Product License Hard to Understand? Try Another Language!

Some user reported that in the text-mode installation it was impossible to switch the language of a product license. Although during graphical installation everything works flawlessly, in text mode the language switching widget was there… but disabled.

The point is that such behavior was not exactly a bug. It was in fact done on purpose. We decided to prevent such language change some time ago because on the Linux console we’re not able to display the characters of many languages. Hopefully some of our usual reader have just shout “that’s not true!” ­čśë Those users remember that in the report of our 67th sprint we explained that now we always use fbiterm when installing in text mode in order to be able to display characters of almost every language.

We are now able to display all languages that currently have license translations, so we have enabled the language switching widget and now both graphical installation and text-based one deliver an equivalent user experience.

More about languages

This is not the only change related to internationalization we did in these sprints. We also added a specific warning message for situations in which YaST is used to change the language of the system but there is no repository containing the needed translation packages. Something that obviously only affects users configuring system in very restricted environments.

As you can see in this and other recent reports, we have to deal relatively often with difficulties related to translation and internationalization. To reduce the effect of those problems on our final users, we also added some extra mechanisms to detect internationalization errors introduced during development. Hopefully that will mean that in future reports the space dedicated to comment language-related problems gets shorter and shorter. ­čÖé

And that was just a summary!

As long as this post looks, there are many interesting things we have done in these weeks we left out, intentionally or not. We definitely should avoid skipping three reports in a row in the future!

This week it’s Hack Week at SUSE, which means regular YaST development will be put on hold… or will turn into something completely different. You never know what the result of a Hack Week can be!

But in any case we will go back to our sprint-based pace in August. So expect a new blog post in three weeks. See you then!

Getting further with Btrfs in YaST

June 19th, 2019 by

Since the YaST team rewrote the software stack for managing the storage devices, we have been adding and presenting new capabilities in that area regularly. That includes, among other features, the unpaired ability to format and partition all kind of devices and the possibility of creating and managing Bcache devices. Time has come to present another largely awaited feature that is just landing in openSUSE Tumbleweed: support for multi-device Btrfs file systems.

As our usual readers surely know, Btrfs is a modern file system for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features that go beyond the scope and capabilities of traditional file systems. Such capabilities include subvolumes (separate internal file system roots), writable and read-only snapshots, efficient incremental backup and our today’s special: support for distributing a single file system over multiple block devices.

Multi-device Btrfs at a glance

Ok, you got it. YaST now supports multi-device Btrfs file system… but, what that exactly means? Well, as simple as it sounds, it’s possible to create a Btrfs file system over several disks, partitions or any other block devices. Pretty much like a software-defined RAID. In fact, you can use it to completely replace software RAIDs.

Let’s see an example. Imagine you have two disks, /dev/sda and /dev/sdb, and you also have some partitions on the first disk. You can create a Btrfs file system over some devices at the same time, e.g., over /dev/sda2 and /dev/sdb, so you will have a configuration that looks like this.

        /dev/sda                /dev/sdb
            |                       |   
            |                       |   
     ---------------                |   
    |               |               |   
    |               |               |   
/dev/sda1       /dev/sda2           |   
                    |               |   
                    |               |   
                     ---------------
                            |   
                          Btrfs
                            |   
                            |   
                            @ (default subvolume)
                            |   
                            |   
                 -----------------------
                |       |       |       |   
                |       |       |       |   
              @/home  @/log   @/srv    ...

Once you have the file system over several devices, you can configure it to do data striping, mirroring, striping + mirroring, etc. Basically everything that RAID can do. In fact, you can configure how to treat the data and the Btrfs meta-data separately. For example, you could decide to do striping with your data (by setting the data RAID level to the raid0 value) and to do mirroring with the Btrfs meta-data (setting it as raid1 level). For both, data and meta-data, you can use the following levels: single, dup, raid0, raid1, raid10, raid5 and raid6.

The combination of this feature and Btrfs subvolumes opens an almost endless world of possibilities. It basically allows you to manage your whole storage configuration from the file system itself. Usage of separate tools and layers like software-defined RAID or LVM are simply dispensable when using Btrfs in all its glory.

Managing multi-device Btrfs with the YaST Partitioner

Interesting feature indeed, but where to start? As usual, YaST brings you the answer! Let’s see how the YaST version that is currently being integrated in openSUSE Tumbleweed will ease the management of this cool Btrfs feature. SLE and Leap users will have to wait to the next release (15.2) to enjoy all the bells and whistles.

First of all, the Btrfs section of our beloved Expert Partitioner has been revamped as shown in the following picture.

New Btrfs section of the Partitioner

It lists all the Btrfs file systems, single- and multi-device ones. You can distinguish them at first sight by the format of the name. The table contains the most relevant information about the file systems, alongside buttons to add a new file system and to delete and modify the existing ones.

Existing Btrfs file system can be inspected and modified in several ways. The “Overview” tab includes details like the mount point, file system label, UUID, data and meta-data RAID levels, etc. The file system can be edited to modify some aspects like the mount options or the subvolumes.

Overview of a Btrfs file system

In addition, the tab called “Used Devices” contains a detailed list of the block devices being used by the file system. That list can also be modified to add or remove devices. Note such operation can only be done when the file system does not exist on disk yet. Theoretically, Btrfs allows to add and remove devices from an already created file system, but a balancing operation would be needed after that. Such balancing operation could take quite a considerable amount of time. For that reason it has been avoided in the Expert Partitioner.

Devices of a Btrfs file system

Of course, you can still format a single device as Btrfs in the traditional way (using the “edit” button for such device). But let’s see how the new button for adding a Btrfs file system opens new possibilities.

Adding a Btrfs file system

Similar to the RAID dialog, you have the available devices on the left and you can select the devices where you want to create the file system, and also you can indicate the data and meta-data RAID levels. Of course, the admissible RAID levels will depend on the number of selected devices. You will go to the second step of the Btrfs creation by clicking the “Next” button. In this second step, you can select the mount options and define the subvolumes, see the next image.

Options for a new Btrfs file system

And apart of all that, the Expert Partitioner has received several small improvements after including multi-device Btrfs file systems. Now that the multi-device Btrfs file systems are considered first class citizens, they are included in the general list of devices. Note the “Type” column has also been improved to show more useful information, not only for Btrfs but for all kind of devices.

Revamped list of devices

What else works?

But YaST goes far beyond the Partitioner. We have also ensured the storage proposal (i.e. the Guided Setup) can deal with existing multi-device Btrfs configurations when you are performing a new installation. Moreover, the upgrade process is also ready to work with your multi-device Btrfs file system.

Last but not least, AutoYaST can now also be used to specify that kind of Btrfs setups. The official AutoYaST documentation will include a specific section about advanced management of Btrfs file systems on top of several block devices. The content is being reviewed by the SUSE documentation team right now.

What does not work (yet)?

There is still one scenario that is not 100% covered. As described in bug#1137997, is still not possible to use the “Import Mount Points” button in the Partitioner to recreate a multi-device Btrfs layout. But fear not, it’s in our list of things to fix in the short term!

Get it while it’s hot

Free Software development is a collaborative process and now we need YOU to do your part. Please test this new feature and report bugs if something does not work as you expected. And please, come with your ideas and further improvements and use cases. And, of course, don’t forget to have a lot of fun!

Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 76

April 30th, 2019 by

While the openSUSE Conference 2019 is approaching, the YaST team is still busy not only fixing small bugs for the upcoming (open)SUSE releases but working on features and changes for later versions.

Although there is much more work behind this sprint, we will have a look at these changes in this report:

  • The first bits of the YaST Network refactoring have been submitted to factory.
  • AutoYaST gets support for specifying NFS shares in a sane way.
  • The Partitioner’s tree behaviour has been improved.
  • Libyui has been updated to support Qt 5.13 (do not miss the screenshots in this report).
  • The installer does not offer enabling autologin for text-only system roles.

But that’s not all. We have some pretty exciting news regarding the LibYUI Testing Framework which, hopefully, will reduce the hassle of maintaining YaST openQA tests in the future. If you are interested, we published a separate post a few days ago with all the details about this topic.

Submitting First Bits of the YaST Network Refactoring to Factory

yast2-network 4.2.2 is the first version which includes some code from the ongoing refactoring effort. As we announced in our last report, we have just started and there is a long road ahead of us, but you can see some results already in the routes management area.

Additionally to cleaning up and improving the codebase quality, we are fixing some bugs and introducing some minor enhancements along the process. For instance, version 4.2.2 permits to have multiple default routes and does not drop extra options for them.

New network routing dialog

If you want to know more details about the process, you might be interested in the kickstart meeting notes that we added to our repository a few days ago.

Auto-installation onto NFS Shares: the Sane Way

During the previous sprint, AutoYaST was powered again with the capability of installing onto an NFS share. That feature was available in SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 (and openSUSE 42.x) but, for several reasons, we did overlook it when the new storage stack was re-implemented for (open)SUSE 15.

The problem with this feature in older versions, apart of not being documented at all, is that it requires to use some hacks and a non-validating AutoYaST profile. For that reason, we have redesigned how NFS drives are described in the AutoYaST profile. With the new format, we have a drive section per each NFS share, for example,

<partitioning config:type="list">
  <drive>
    <device>192.168.1.1:/exports/root_fs</device>
    <type config:type="symbol">CT_NFS</type>
    <use>all</use>
    <partitions config:type="list">
      <partition>
        <mount>/</mount>
        <fstopt>nolock</fstopt>
      </partition>
    </partitions>
  </drive>
</partitioning>

Although the old format is still supported to keep backward compatibility, we encourage you to use the new one for now on. And of course, this feature will be appropriately documented in the official (open)SUSE 15 documentation.

No Longer Offering Autologin for Text-Only System Roles

Autologin is a feature that most modern display managers (KDM, GDM, SDDM, LightDM) offer as a convenience function for home users. Users reported that YaST also provided this for the “Server (text only)” system role where that does not make sense, so we fixed that.

Yet Another Qt Version

This is not actually a big deal; there is another version of the Qt libs which we use for the graphical version of YaST. Now it’s Qt 5.13, and we needed to adapt some functions that have become obsolete in the meantime. Fortunately, Qt always provides drop-in replacements for things they obsolete, so this was mostly a pretty mechanical task to go through the warnings about functions or classes that are now obsolete and replace them with the new counterpart.

But how long have we been doing that? Quite a while, actually; it all started with Qt 2.x in late 1999 for SuSE Linux 6.3. That was the first YaST2. It already came in both a Qt version with a graphical user interface and in a text-only (NCurses) version.

SuSE Linux 6.3 Installer

Back then we were more advanced than the KDE of that time: KDE 1.x was still using Qt 1.x, and the first version of YaST2 already used Qt 2.x. We kept upgrading throughout all the Qt 2.x versions and in SuSE Linux 9.0 we jumped to Qt3, which looked like this.

SuSE Linux Professional 9.0

And as you know, that’s not the end of the story. We have kept updating through all the Qt 3.x, Qt 4.x and now Qt 5.x versions, as you can see in the following screenshot of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15.1. It’s been a while: almost 20 years of happy Qt usage, always up-to-date.

openSUSE Leap 15.1

Improving the Partitioner UX

When it comes to UX, the tree of our new and shiny partitioner needed some love. We fixed an annoying issue which caused all the branches to be expanded after every change on any device. Besides that, we also changed the initial view. See the screenshot below in which sections -levels with icons like “Hard Disks” or “RAID”- are initially expanded and items representing devices are collapsed, not displaying, for example, the full list of partitions until the user decides to expand those.

YaST Partitioner Screenshot

However, the bad news is that these changes will not be available in (open)SUSE 15.1, although you can give it a try as soon as they land in Tumbleweed.

LetÔÇÖs Talk about Multi-device Btrfs

The improved behavior of the navigation tree is not the only enhancement in the Partitioner we are preparing for the future (where ÔÇťfutureÔÇŁ means Tumbleweed and the 15.2 releases of both SLE and openSUSE Leap). We also want to make possible to use the YaST Partitioner to define Btrfs file-systems that spread over several disks and partitions. ThatÔÇÖs a pretty unique feature of Btrfs that combines at file-system level certain characteristics usually offered by software RAID and LVM.

But that also implies a quite different way of organizing the storage devices, which is a challenge to represent in the already complex user interface of the Expert Partitioner. So, first of all, we have put together this document describing all the struggles of representing advanced Btrfs features in the Partitioner, together with some possible solutions for the short and mid terms.

Please, feel free to provide feedback about the proposed solutions and to offer new ones. Help us to shape the future of the YaST interface!

Conclusions

As we mentioned at the beginning of this report, we owe you a blog post about the Libyui Testing Framework status. But as you wait for it, you might want to register for the openSUSE Conference or check the schedule.

Announcing LibYUI Testing Framework

April 26th, 2019 by

The LibYUI framework brings enormous advantage when you need an application which can be used with X and ncurses. But while for Qt, integration testing is a solved problem, meaning there are multiple tools available, the situation is not that rose-colored in case of ncurses. On top, using different tooling would require additional efforts for the framework development. So everything started with openQA, which is using screen comparison with advanced fuzzy logic. This approach kept the costs of the tests development low, but maintenance is still painful when UI changes.

Considering all of the above, Ladislav Slez├ík and Rodion Iafarov has been working on a proper solution taking Ladislav’s proposal for Hack Week 15 as starting point. The idea is plain simple: provide an HTTP/JSON API which allows interacting with LibYUI by reading and setting different UI properties. Consequently, if some button was moved, resized or got new shortcut key assigned, we do not need to adapt the test code anymore.

Obviously, this functionality is not required in a production system, so we have created separate packages for this purpose. Here you can find GitHub repository containing some documentation.

Demo time!

As cool as it sounds, it is even better when you see it in action. In the screencast below you can see how the user can interact with YaST Host module using cURL from the command line.

LibYUI Testing Framework in Action

How to Test the New Packages

If you want to give it a try, you can use the packages we have prepared for you. However, it is recommended to use a virtual machine to not pollute (or accidentally break) your system. You have been warned. ­čÖé

First of all, you need to get new packages, which are currently available in YaST:Head project in OBS. Navigate to Repositories tab and get the repository which matches the distribution you are running. Afterwards you should be able to install libyui-rest-api package. Also, you need to update related packages and YaST2 modules were recompiled using latest LibYUI. To do that, simply run the following command, where YaST:Head is the repository added in the previous step:

zypper up --allow-vendor-change -r YaST:Head

With the required software in place, you need to start a YaST module setting the environment variable Y2TEST to 1:

xdg-su -c 'Y2TEST=1 YUI_HTTP_PORT=9999 yast2 host' # for Qt
sudo Y2TEST=1 YUI_HTTP_PORT=9999 yast2 host # for ncurses

To allow remote connections you can add YUI_HTTP_REMOTE=1. For security reasons, only connections from localhost are allowed by default.

Now you should be able to see something like the screenshot below by navigating with your browser to http://localhost:9999.

LibYUI Testing Framework Browser

Further steps

As you can see, we have not implemented a wrapper for the POST and GET requests to the HTTP server yet, although it will be the next step. We are trying to to find a solution which allows us running tests locally from the terminal, in CI using stable distribution versions, and finally in openQA for development builds.

Other things which are coming:

Security Notice

YaST is usually running with the root permissions, that means everybody who can connect to the HTTP/JSON API can read the values and send button clicks. And because there is no authentication yet, this is a big security problem. In a nutshell: do not use the API in production systems! It has been designed only for testing in a secure environment.

Closing Thoughts

We are pretty excited about this project for several reasons. On the one hand, because we expect it to reduce the maintenance burden of our integration tests. On the other hand, because it is a nice example of Hack Week benefits and cross-team collaboration.

If you are interested, we will try to keep you in the loop by posting information regularly as part of YaST sprints reports.

Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 75

April 10th, 2019 by

With the upcoming releases of openSUSE Leap 15.1 and SLE-15-SP1 approaching, the YaST Team at SUSE is investing a quite significant time in polishing details and fixing small (and not so small) bugs. But fortunately, that still leaves us enough time to also work in our mid term goals.

So welcome to our usual selection of selected bug-fixes (listing them all would be boring) and exciting new stuff. This edition includes:

  • A nice howto for reporting Snapper bugs
  • Tons of fixes for right-to-left languages like Arabic
  • Some adjustments and improvements in the storage area
  • A sneak peak into the future of the yast2-network code
  • Some contributor-oriented content: like our new pull request templates and revamped Docker images for testing

Snapper Bug Reporting Howto

During this sprint we fixed a bug that was causing Snapper to crash under very specific circumstances. The scenario was quite unusual so we had to request quite some information from the reporter of the bug to confirm what was happening. As a nice consequence, in addition to having now a more robust Snapper (one bug killed) you can also enjoy a new page in the openSUSE wiki listing the information you should attach to Bugzilla if you find a bug in Snapper while using (open)SUSE.

Which is also a nice excuse to remind you about the equivalent "Report a YaST bug" page.

YaST around the globe… in all directions

Many of the YaST users and of our blog readers are not native English speakers that surely appreciate the fact that YaST and (open)SUSE in general can be used in several languages. But have you ever thought about the implications of developing a multi-language software? Sure? In all of them? ­čśë

Human languages are so diverse as the human cultures and there are many details to take into account, from the usage of different alphabets to the various ways of dealing with genre or number (in English the words have just one form for singular and another for plural, but that can be way more complex in other languages). In today’s issue we will take a look to one of our favorite translation issues – languages that are written from right to left, like Arabic.

The installer summary in Arabic

Dealing with text that is a mixture of Latin and Arabic script is complex and sometimes we have to deal with interesting bugs. Fortunately we have our own weapon to fight those bugs. If in Star Wars they have protocol droids like C3PO, in the YaST team we have Martin Vidner, which is the closer human equivalent.

He fixed all the reported bugs and even created a tool to help debugging similar problems in the future. You can find the source code of that tool in Github. There is even a hosted instance of the tool to be used by translators or anyone who is curious.

Now, even complex interfaces like our Partitioner look correct enough in right-to-left languages, so we will not have to send mirrors to all our Arabic users.

The YaST Partitioner in Arabic

If you want to know more about this exciting but very complex problem of bidirectional texts, you can start with the following documents.

  • Martin’s great summary of the types problems found in YaST and their respective solutions.
  • Wikipedia: Bi-directional text, an overview of the concepts
  • Unicode Standard Annex #9: Unicode Bidirectional Algorithm, the gory details, 50 pages of them
  • More Arabic YaST

    On related news, we got also some reports about some problems visualizing bullet-points in Korean with the beta versions of the future SLE-15-SP1. But as we could verify, all those problems are gone now.

    SLES installer in Korean

    Storage Fixes

    Other area that has received some attention in this sprint is the storage management. Three related features needed adjustments before the upcoming (open)SUSE releases:

    • Fixed the detection of the boot disk in the Partitioner warnings.
    • The Guided Setup now works better when doing several attempts in different disks.
    • AutoYaST can now install over NFS.

    One of the last storage features that the YaST Team has developed is the support for Bcache devices in the Expert Partitioner. While our QA team was testing it, they found a bug. The Partitioner was complaining because the boot disk did not contain a partition table, which is a mandatory condition for a Legacy (non-UEFI) x86 system. But it was a bogus warning, since they had actually defined a /boot partition in another disk.

    That’s how we found that our Partitioner gets confused if there is a separate partition mounted at /boot and located in a different disk than the root file-system. The Partitioner insisted in considering the disk containing / to be the one that would be using for booting, instead of checking the structure of the disk containing /boot. Now that is fixed and the improvement will be available for the upcoming SLE 15 SP1, Leap 15.1 and, of course, openSUSE Tumbleweed.

    But that was not the only storage bug fixed just in time for the upcoming releases. Some sprints ago, the Storage Proposal algorithm for the initial proposal was modified to try installing on each of the individual disks. If the installation was not possible over a given disk, even after disabling all optional configurations (e.g., snapshots and separate /home), a new proposal is tried over the next disk and so on. The problem was that the disabled options in the previous attempt were not restored back when switching to the next disk. This caused some ugly side effects, for example, if the swap partition was disabled when trying over the first disk, then the proposal did not try to create a swap when it was performing the proposal over the next disk. But now this is also fixed and it will work as expected.

    And last but not least, AutoYaST now supports to install over a Network File System (NFS). This feature was left back when the new YaST storage stack was re-implemented for SLE 15 GA. Actually, this is a non documented feature. That’s why we overlooked that SUSE 12 was able to do it using some hacks and a non-validating AutoYaST profile. But no worries, the feature is available again and such profile will work now in any updated SLE-15 or Leap 15.0. Of course, it will also work while installing SLE-15-SP1 or openSUSE Leap 15.1 and Tumbleweed.

    Nevertheless, we are working on a better and documented way of supporting that scenario in the future, with no need to twist the specification of the AutoYaST profile. Stay tuned for more information.

    Rethinking the Location of Special Boot Partitions

    And now that the storage layer looks sane and healthy for the upcoming releases, we also took some time to think about future improvements. As you know, the storage Guided Setup always proposes to create special boot partitions as needed on each case. That can be a BIOS BOOT (for Legacy x86 systems with GPT), an ESP (for UEFI systems), PReP (for PPC systems) or zipl (for S/390 systems). Strictly speaking those partitions doesn’t have to always be in the same disk than the root partition and in some cases having it on a separate one can have some advantages (like sharing the ESP partition with another operating systems).

    But we have been reconsidering all the cases, the expectations of most users and of the majority of BIOS vendors and the known bugs in other operating systems about sharing boot partitions. We have decided to be more strict in the future about the location of those partitions. Starting today with openSUSE Tumbleweed and in the 15.2 releases of openSUSE Leap and SLE, the Guided Setup will always propose those partitions in the system disk. That is, in the disk containing /boot and the root filesystem.

    The future of YaST Network is here

    Those who follow this blog know that we invested quite some time on the last couple of years rewriting the part of YaST that was more buggy and harder to modify – the storage stack. And surely you have already noticed that since we did it we are introducing new features at a very good pace (like bcache, more powerful Partitioner, Raspberry Pi support, etc.) and fixing the reported bugs in a matter of days or even hours.

    The next in our list of YaST areas to revamp is the networking support. And we are happy to announce that we are starting to have some visible results in that. There is still a very long road ahead and we will provide more information in upcoming reports. But at least we have already a preview of a fully rewritten management of network routes. It’s still not available in openSUSE Tumbleweed. But for those who can’t wait, here you can see the first screenshot. All based in new and clean code backed by automated tests.

    New network routing dialog

    Activating Online Repositories in openSUSE Leap 15.1

    The openSUSE Tumbleweed installer asks at the beginning of the installation whether to activate and use the online repositories when a network connection is available.

    The reason is that the installation DVD does not contain all available packages because of the limited media size. Another advantage is that the installer might directly install newer packages than on the media, this avoids installing the older versions first and then upgrading them to the latest version.

    However, in some case you might not want to use the online repositories, for example if the network connection is slow or is paid.

    We got a bug report that this question was missing in the Leap 15.1. It turned out that the control.xml file which drives the installer did not contain this step. After adding few lines into the file you can now enjoy the online repositories also in Leap 15.1!

    Online repositories in Leap 15.1

    Why are we writing about this? The reason for the missing step in the Leap 15.1 was a bit surprising. Normally all YaST packages are developed in the Git master branch for both Tumbleweed and Leap. However, in this case the Leap 15.1 has been already branched and was developed separately, the changes in the master went only to the Tumbleweed. And we overlooked that small difference when adding this step.

    To avoid this in the future we added a pull request template with a reminder which informs the developers about this difference in the Git setup when opening a pull request.

    If your project also has some unusual setup then the pull request template might a good reminder for you as well.

    Building the Docker Images in OBS

    But the reminders about the correct branches and procedures is not the only news we have for YaST contributors and main developers. As you may remember, few years ago we switched to using Docker at Travis. That works well but we found some disadvantages of that initial setup.

    • You need extra account at the Docker Hub to manage the images.
    • There is no link between OBS and the Docker Hub, we cannot easily trigger image rebuild when a package is updated in OBS.
    • We only blindly triggered the rebuild every 2 hours (in some cases the rebuild is not necessary, in some cases it took too much time).
    • The Docker Hub can use the new OBS packages only after they are published by OBS.
    • The build at the Docker Hub is quite slow (~20 minutes in our case), if an image is currently being built the build is added into the queue and it will start after the previous builds are finished.

    The result is that a new package can be available in Travis several hours after merging the pull request. And even after triggering the build manually it still might take more than one hour.

    We needed a faster cycle and the solution, as usually happens, was in the openSUSE ecosystem. As you may know, the Open Build Service is able of much more than just building packages. So we decided to make use of the OBS capacity of building Docker images.

    Building both our packages and our Docker images in OBS comes with many advantages:

    • The image build is started immediately when the new packages are built, it does not wait for publishing the packages and does not wait for full rebuild (only for the needed packages).
    • No extra accounts/permissions (just use your OBS account).
    • The build in OBS is faster (6-7 minutes).
    • No need for extra Jenkins jobs periodically triggering the image rebuilds.

    This means the new packages should be available in the Docker image in about 10-15 minutes after merging a pull request (for leaf packages, changing a core package which triggers a complete YaST rebuild will of course take more time).

    If you want to learn more about this topic, take a look to the following links:

    And that was not all!

    As usual, the content of this report is just a small subset of all the work the YaST Team does in two weeks. In this sprint, most of that work went to fixing all kind of bugs in preparation for the next releases. Big bugs, small ones, hidden bugs and embarrassingly obvious ones. Hopefully, you got a fix for your reported bug. If not, you can always stay tuned for more news after the next sprint. And don’t forget to have a lot of fun!

experimental openSUSE mirror via IPFS

April 3rd, 2019 by

The InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) can be used to provide files in a more efficient and distributed way than HTTP.

Our filesystem repo already has the go-ipfs client.

You use it with
ipfs daemon --init

And then you can add my Tumbleweed mirror with
zypper ar http://127.0.0.1:8080/ipns/opensuse.zq1.de./tumbleweed/repo/oss/ ipfs-oss

You can also browse the content online at
http://opensuse.zq1.de./tumbleweed/repo/oss/ . During my testing I found that the results are sometimes inappropriately cached on the Cloudflare CDN, so if you used it under this URL without the ipfs client, this might throw signature errors in zypper.

On the server side, the mirror is updated using the syncopensuse script from
https://github.com/bmwiedemann/opensusearchive and consistency of the repo is verified with checkrepo

When a complete repo was synced, dynaname updates a DNS entry to point to the new head:

> host -t txt _dnslink.opensuse.zq1.de.
_dnslink.opensuse.zq1.de is an alias for tumbleweedipfs.d.zq1.de.
tumbleweedipfs.d.zq1.de descriptive text “Last update: 2019-04-03 12:23:43 UTC”
tumbleweedipfs.d.zq1.de descriptive text “dnslink=/ipfs/QmSXEVuU5z23rDxMyFYDhSAUaGRUPswuSXD3aVsBEzucjE”

If you got spare bandwidth and 300 GB disk on some public server, you could also host a mirror of today’s version, simply by doing ipfs pin add QmSXEVuU5z23rDxMyFYDhSAUaGRUPswuSXD3aVsBEzucjE

This is a permalink: http://127.0.0.1:8080/ipfs/QmSXEVuU5z23rDxMyFYDhSAUaGRUPswuSXD3aVsBEzucjE also browsable via any public IPFS gateway. This means, it will always remain on the 20190401 version of Tumbleweed and no changes in content are possible – similar to how a git commit ID always refers to the same data.

So why did I create this IPFS mirror? That is related to my work on reproducible builds for openSUSE. There it regularly happened that published Tumbleweed binaries were built with libraries, compilers and toolchains that were no longer available in current Tumbleweed. This prevented me from verifying that the published binaries were indeed built correctly without manipulation on the OBS build workers.

Now, with this archive of rpms easily available, it was possible to verify many more Tumbleweed packages than before. And most importantly, it remains possible to independently verify even after Tumbleweed moves on to newer versions. This data is going to stay available as long as anyone pins it on a reachable server. I’m going to pin it as long as it remains relevant to me, so probably a bit until after the next full Tumbleweed rebuild – maybe 6 to 12 months.

Thus, it now is even less easy to sneak in binary backdoors during our package build process.

┼╗egnamy forum.suse.pl i witamy forums.opensuse.org

March 31st, 2019 by

Witajcie,

10 wrze┼Ťnia 2004 roku cyberluk wys┼éa┼é do mnie i do Mirona tak─ů wiadomo┼Ť─ç:

Witam,

Od pocz─ůtku istnienia Forum uwa┼╝nie obserwujemy u┼╝ytkownik├│w i ich wypowiedzi. Wczoraj pad┼éa propozycja, ┼╝eby zaoferowa─ç dwom osobom moderowanie Forum. Dzisiaj po dyskusji na ten temat ustalili┼Ťmy, ┼╝e faktycznie te osoby dostana status moderatora, oczywi┼Ťcie o ile si─Ö na to zgodz─ů. Jedna z tych os├│b jest Pan. Czy pasuje Panu status moderatora?
Drugiej osoby na razie nie ujawniamy. Dostanie takiego samego maila.
Oczywi┼Ťcie cala za┼éoga b─Ödzie nadal patrze─ç, co si─Ö dzieje z Forum, ale praca jest prac─ů i czasami nie ma czasu na zajmowanie sie Forum.
Liczymy na pozytywna odpowiedz. Na razie jest to status moderatora Forum, ale zacz─Öli┼Ťmy si─Ö r├│wnie┼╝ zastanawia─ç nad FAQiem, kt├│ry by┼éby zbiorem problem├│w z Forum “w pigu┼éce”. Oczywi┼Ťcie status moderatora wi─ůza┼éby si─Ö z odpowiednimi uprawnieniami przy takim FAQu.

cyberluk

Oczywi┼Ťcie pod domen─ů forum.suse.pl ju┼╝ wcze┼Ťniej by┼é dost─Öpny skrypt phpBB. Jednak to po┼éowa 2004 roku spowodowa┼éa, ┼╝e Forum otworzy┼éo si─Ö na zwyk┼éych u┼╝ytkownik├│w. To w┼éa┼Ťnie zwykli u┼╝ytkownicy zdominowali Forum, tworzyli jego kontent, zarz─ůdzali nim i warto to podkre┼Ťli─ç. Pocz─ůtkowo Novell Professional Services, a ostatecznie SUSE Polska, udost─Öpnia┼éo nam, polskiej spo┼éeczno┼Ťci, zasoby i przestrze┼ä, z kt├│rych z po┼╝ytkiem dla ka┼╝dego z nas korzystali┼Ťmy.

W ten spos├│b przez pi─Ötna┼Ťcie lat zwykli u┼╝ytkownicy, power userzy, a tak┼╝e ludzie zawodowo zwi─ůzani z bran┼╝─ů IT dzielili si─Ö mi─Ödzy sob─ů do┼Ťwiadczeniem na Oficjalnym Polskim Forum SUSE Linux. Czas je po┼╝egna─ç.

Obecnie przestrzeni─ů dla nas b─Ödzie forums.opensuse.org. B─Öd─ůc bli┼╝ej Projektu openSUSE, b─Ödzie nam ┼éatwiej w┼é─ůczy─ç si─Ö w r├│┼╝nego rodzaju aktywno┼Ťci i koordynowa─ç je. Natomiast zwykli u┼╝ytkownicy zyskaj─ů dost─Öp do znacznie wi─Ökszej spo┼éeczno┼Ťci.

Polska sekcja jest widoczna jako subforum pod adresem forums.opensuse.org lub bezpo┼Ťrednio forums.opensuse.org/forumdisplay.php/936-Polski

W przypadku problem├│w z rejestracj─ů, prosz─Ö o kontakt: pbojczuk@opensuse.org.

Poradnik przetrwania:
forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/531844-Poradnik-przetrwania-na-forums-opensuse-org?p=2871109

Dost─Öp do forum.suse.pl b─Ödzie ograniczany, a samo Forum wkr├│tce zamkni─Öte.

Love & bruises,
Przemys┼éaw “StefanÔÇŁ Bojczuk

Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 74

March 29th, 2019 by

It took only 73 sprints to complete all YaST features, and there are none left to do. That’s what you might think after reading this article, because we worked on no features, just bug fixes.

It might be related to an upcoming release of SLE 15 SP1. For its openSUSE sibling we have put together a recap of YaST features in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15.1 (scheduled for May 2019), since Leap 15.0 (May 2018).

No more locale errors during Kubic runtime

Did you know that an installed Kubic (the certified Kubernetes distribution & container-related technologies built by the openSUSE community) only has the American English locale (en_US) available? That is because it intends to be as small as possible (you can run du -h /usr/share/locale if you are curious enough).

However, YaST allows you to change the language and the keyboard layout at the very beginning of the installation process, which will be persisted as the default locale in the installed system. This is the reason for those locale errors mentioned above. Until now. Because we introduced some changes during this sprint to allow that the chosen language will be used only during the installation in case the product needs it.

So, from now on you can go through the installation of Kubic in your preferred language without those errors in the final system and, of course, preserving the selected keyboard layout. Not bad, huh? 😎

Various Fixes

Repositories for add-ons would be marked as disabled after the installation has finished. We have fixed this bug#1127818.

When registering your SUSE Linux Enterprise with the SUSE Customer Center or its proxy such as the SUSE Subscription Management Tool, a network timeout can occur. Formerly you had to use the Back and Next buttons to try again but we have added a Retry button for that.

When creating a new partition or editing an existing one, the widget for the partition type would list the types in a seemingly random order. We have made this widget more boring.