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AMD FGLRX new rebuild 14.501.1003-2 supporting Kernel 3.19 for openSUSE 13.1 13.2 and Tumbleweed

February 27th, 2015 by

There’s a new build published today for the AMD FGLRX drivers.

It include the new patch made by Sebastian Siebert supporting Kernel 3.19x series you could have on 13.1, 13.2 and Tumbleweed openSUSE distribution.

The server just got the new rpms, so you should be able to update with zypper ref -f && zypper up

Have fun.

openSUSE miniSummit @Scale13x – summary

February 20th, 2015 by

Hi Geekos, here a small summary of our Thursday February 19th openSUSE miniSummit event here at SCale 13x.

Located in Century AB room, a 80 seats room. The average attendance rate was varying between 50% and 85%.
Qualifying the attendance 50% or more were not related to SUSE / openSUSE, which was a good experience of question and feedback.

openSUSE miniSummit T-shirt

The day started by a talk about openSUSE / SUSE Xen and openstack by Peter Linnel and Russel Pavlicek.
One hour later Manu Gupta has presented all the bolts and nuts about GSOC at openSUSE.

We then go for lunch, and corridor exchanges.

I’ve opened the afternoon with my talk “them + me = we” about breaking mythic frontier
Then just after a small break, Mark Fasheh member of filesystem SUSE Labs group has talk about the project Duperemove: dedupe on btrfs (have a look on github the source are there, and package available on obs)

The day continue with a Town Hall talk co-animated by myself and Peter running an open discussion with attendees. With interesting remarks and feedback from openSUSE users, and also complete foreigners. For example, the way systemd was introduced in openSUSE distribution was appreciated (having choice during 2 versions). It was an unstressfull, open and positive exchange.

To follow, Bryan Lunduke and Peter animated a talk about “the 10 things you would love about SUSE and openSUSE if you only you knew…”
I did really enjoy the way they numbered the slides …
Freschy, punchy, funky, the kinda talk I would like to see again at OSC15.

To finalize the day, Markus Feilner​ for Linux Magazine (de) talked about openQA.

I found interesting the perfect mix we’ve done between openSUSE and SUSE during this day, confirming the excellent partnership we have.
Let the sponsors of this day be warmly thanked to make it happened.

Links :
SCale picture album day 1 : by Françoise on G+

openSUSE miniSummit day album :
Bruno’s Album on G+

Follow the news on G+ channel

Stay tuned for more news during this week-end.

Lizards, time to pack your stuff for openSUSE miniSummit @Scale 13x

February 17th, 2015 by

Again this year the thirteen annual Southern California Linux Expo is in the starting block.

scale_13x_onair

During 3 days you will be able to visit us at our booth (38,39,40).
Yeah 3 booths cause we co-run the KDE and Gnome booth.
The exhibition hall open Friday afternoon at 2pm.


Drew and Peter are working as daemon to get everything ready to spread, Doug have brought also quite numerous goodies there. I will do my best to inform you here or follow my G+ channel
scale_13x_hands-feets

Whatever the way you come, bring your feet there and shake hands.
On Thursday, no one has to miss our full day of openSUSE mini-summit, room Century AB.
There will be interesting talks and also a full green hallway, We’re looking forward SUSE’s team, working together in this promising adventure.

scale13x_luggage_ready
On our side Geeko is ready to cross 9.000 kilometers tomorrow.
Hey cool first time in the famous Airbus A380…
Demo laptop with Tumbleweed and KF5 is also secured.



See you all in Los Angeles

fonts @ openSUSE

February 17th, 2015 by

Since I maintain fontconfig, time to time I hear contradicting opinions which font families should be used in the system if not said otherwise, i. e. which families should be preferred for sans, serif and monospace generic aliases and how they should be rendered. Bug reports I got was talking about overall system defaults, concerning fontconfig rules therefore.

General idea was to weaken the word ‘default’ in regard to font setting by creating a direct window into basic fontconfig setting of the system (of course: for advanced effects, fontconfig xml coding is still needed).

For my convenience, YaST framework was used and new module called fonts had seen the light of the day not long ago. It is packaged as yast2-fonts in Tumbleweed and in my home for openSUSE 13.2.

yast-fonts-tabS

I hope that, together with fontinfo.o.o, tuning your fonts will be much easier!

Certainly, this module is not done. Firstly, I would like to fix bugs which users will meet. After this stabilizing period, perhaps next hackweek, I will consider how hard would be to add per-user setting capability to fonts-config script, which would almost automatically mean per-user font setting capability in the module itself.

HTH

SSD configuration for openSUSE

February 6th, 2015 by

As you already know, there are mechanic disks and also SSD. There is the rumor that SSDs last for 5 years or up to 5 years. Read the openSUSE wiki page for more information about openSUSE and SSD.

Here I’ll describe what I did to my SSD.

RULE 1: Partitioning

The first step is creating the right partitions. First of all, create the root partition (about 15-20GB is enough). Then create the home partition (/home). Finally leave about 7% of the disk unallocated. This will help your disk during write process. The right filesystem is ext4.

If you have new computer, then you should have a partition /boot/efi. You don’t have to do any of the following configuration for that partition.

BE CAREFUL: Don’t create a swap partition. If you already have enough memory (4GB), you don’t need it. Swap memory is “destroying” your SSD. Finally, be careful of the file system, since openSUSE 13.2 uses BTRFS as default filesystem. Snapper will create snapshots, something that you don’t need.

Read the rest of this entry »

Linux audio library smackdown part3: SDL

February 5th, 2015 by

How many of you remember Loki Games/Entertaiment/Software? Hands up  now! I’m still waiting.. wuhuu hands up now! Loki.. Loki! Oh still no hands.. what a pity (Damn how old Am I?). Ok I Admit! It was before Steam, before Internet was this huge fast beast for watching videos, telling how you are doing right now and sharing photos.

Loki only shipped CD’s for installing your application and there wasn’t hot fixes waiting when you got CD from post or yes there where but I had to wait and wait for 200 MB blob to download for ages with my 57600 modem. All the time I thought that I’ll boot Windows for playing Castle Wolfestein. It was long before before Linux have any gaming community what so ever. There weren’t Firefox or Chrome available and Google was just starting to own our lifes.  So it was dark days of late ’90 (we had electricity thanks for asking).

Loki was founded on 1998 and  it got on bankruptcy on 2001 after IT bubble blowed. Loki changed Linux in good way. One thing that they left behind was called Simple Direct Layer (SDL1). SDL layer sits top on Xorg that makes creating games more ease. You can port your game to Windows and Mac OS X with little effort. Current version of SDL is SDL2.

Good thing about SDL is that it abstracts drawing to screen in Windows, Mac OS X and X-windows. SDL1 was all about pixel buffers but SDL2 is all about surfaces and acceleration. It support many more OSes but that’s not the what we are looking at today. So how do you playing audio out of SDL1/2?. Good thing is audio interface stayed same through conversion from SDL1 to SDL2. They only added few bugs and float point audio in SDL2.  SDL1 have recording but I didn’t manage to make it work so if anyone with more patience than me can lead me to correct path I would be happy puppy. Here is SDL Github location: https://github.com/illuusio/linux-audio-example/tree/master/sdl Read the rest of this entry »

Linux audio library smackdown part2: Pulseaudio

January 27th, 2015 by

Oh yes.. those were great times! Open Sound System was rocking my Linux based sound system and I was having a time of my life. Like we all know good doesn’t last long. Soon after happiness I find out that OSS couldn’t do recording and playing (full duplex) same time. Fiery same time this was working on Windows 98 very well. I was shocked how the heck my Linux box is so borked? Luckily times were changing and this time they formed only better. ALSA was about to take over OSS in Kernel version 2.6. Why I’m talking about ALSA and OSS when I should talk about Pulseaudio? Read further to find out why or go examples for Pulseaudio here: https://github.com/illuusio/linux-audio-example/tree/master/pulseaudio Read the rest of this entry »

Final Election Thoughts

January 22nd, 2015 by

As the openSUSE Board election quickly draws to a close, I take a moment to remind openSUSE Members to vote.

Elections and voting are a rather remarkable thing.  We take up or values, our beliefs, our interests, and briefly toss them in the air, letting the air flow somewhat disrupt them as they gently fall like leaves.  We think for a moment: What’s important to me?  Why is this important to me?  And does it really matter who I vote for?  Can a small Board of Directors really make a difference in the larger scheme of things?  Can the elected person really represent my interests?

In American politics, there is much apathy for and little trust in elections.  There are many reasons for this (and it’s a topic for discussion and reflection saved for a very different forum).  But as much analysis is done by professionals who analyze these things, they often conclude that each individual doesn’t think that one vote will matter.  “I’m just one person in an ocean of people; how will my vote matter?”  But for us, well, no one knows better about Freedom and Openness than an opensource community.  Voting — expressing one’s confidence in another person to serve as a representative of an ideal, a promise — is a hallmark of Freedom and Openness.  If only one vote is cast among many, then the ideal of only the one is expressed.  If your vote is not cast and the others of your community are, then your voice is diminished.  When a whole community votes, the full range voices is heard and discerned.

Vote.  Our community is strengthened when your vote is cast.  Whether or not you vote for me, please vote.

I believe it matters.

The election ends on Monday, 26 Jan 2015.

oSC15 – 200, Why not packaging workshop like mini hack sprint

January 17th, 2015 by

welcomeHello Geekos.

I’m contacting you personally, as an openSUSE Board member.

You certainly already know that we want to have a kicking openSUSE conference next 1st-4th May 2015 at the Haag (NL).

Thus I’ve found that creating special workshop organized by development project could foster our beloved distribution.

oSC is the unique case in the year, where Geekos from all around the world meet together.
Let’s imagine you, meeting perhaps for the first time your fellows, having nice discussions, and hacking around the software you maintain.
There’s high level of chance to meet also your end users, and have constructive exchanges.

That’s why I invite you to propose a workshop directly to our event tools:
https://events.opensuse.org/conference/osc15/proposal

Having a workshop run like a mini-hack sprint, would help any of us in the distribution and the project.
Be it like learn people how to submit nice package, how to do maintenance, or how to do bug triage.
li1
I feel confident that you will have the creative approach to resolve your own problematic.
The event place has small rooms for unattended sessions and they could be used to extend your workshop to get some more work done.

Some practical aspects:
oSC website : https://events.opensuse.org/conference/oSC15

And soon the travel support program for oSC 15 will be opened to handle your request about getting financial support for going to oSC.
https://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support/

If you have any questions, thoughts or ideas, don’t hesitate to ask on -project mailing list
or ping me by reply.

A final note about the why you should do it? Well beside being one of our “heroes” even if nobody need them :-)
You and your co-maintainers will be able to explain your “job” on the project.
Don’t you want to inspire new comers, lead them directly to the right direction, and share the load.
Meeting you there, will also help our “marketing” force to light up a bit the work done in the shadow.

I really will appreciate your presence, afterwards, it’s you that create our distribution.
The time has come for you to be warmly thank.

I’m looking forward to see you there.

Linux audio library smackdown part1: Portaudio

January 16th, 2015 by

Common disinformation people tends to believe in is that Linux Audio is in bad shape. Actually it’s not. They are right ALSA is getting bit rusty and it’s not top of the notch but list of supported sound cards is long. There have been speak about next generation audio API for Linux but nothing is really happening (I’m happy if you prove me wrong!). Last year I had task to evaluate different Linux audio libraries for playing audio and recording. So these articles try to make some light to my journey and what did I found. inpatient can go to Github  https://github.com/illuusio/linux-audio-example/tree/master/portaudio. There is other library examples also but only Portaudio is currently updated to my last version. I wrote same very simple application to test every audio library. I’ll upgrade rest of the examples and add also Xiph libao and GStreamer. Read the rest of this entry »