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Highlights of YaST development sprint 35

May 25th, 2017 by

openSUSE Conference 2017 is coming! And as we flight there (literally, one third of the YaST team is in a plane right now typing this), we wanted to inform our beloved readers on what we did in the previous three weeks.

So here is our report, brought to you by airmail!

Bugfixes, bugfixes everywhere

Leaving openSUSE Tumbleweed aside, The YaST team is currently working to deliver SLE12-SP3, openSUSE Leap 42.3, SLE15, openSUSE Leap 15, SUSE CaaSP 1.0 and Kubic (more about Kubic later). Three of them are already in beta phase, which means they are being extensively tested by several parties and in many scenarios, hardware platforms and possible configurations. That amount of manual testing always result in several bug being discovered, no matter how much we try to have some automated tests for the most common cases.

Many of the bugs our testers are finding are related to internationalization and localization, mainly texts in the UI that are always displayed in English, despite the system been configured (or being installed) in a different language.

But, of course, other kind of bugs are also being found. For example, our hardware detection component (hwinfo) was not able to deal with some new machines, making the installation experience everything but pleasant.

As a result, a significant amount of the YaST team manpower during this sprint was targeted to squash those annoying bugs. Which doesn’t mean we didn’t have time for some interesting new features and improvements.

Storage reimplementation: unlock encrypted devices

Once again, our new storage system comes with news. Now it’s able to detect and unlock preexisting encrypted devices during the hard disks probing step, raising you a new pop-pup dialog to ask for the corresponding device password. After unlocking the devices, all your installed systems will be accessible for upgrade and, moreover, the LVM volumes allocated over encrypted devices will be activated.

The new storage stack is expected to debut in SLE15 (and, thus, openSUSE Leap 15), but the functionality can already be tested, for both the installation and upgrade processes, with the StorageNG test ISOs.

Luks activation in StorageNG

The storage reimplementation & AutoYaST – a love story

But the happiest news coming from the new storage stack during this sprint is it’s marriage with AutoYaST. The new automatic partitioning proposal (that is, the “Guided Setup”) is now integrated with AutoYaST.

Thanks to the new software architecture, AutoYaST users will be able to override every single partitioning setting from the control file.

<profile xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns" xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
  <general>
    <storage>
      <!-- Override settings from control file  -->
      <try_separate_home config:type="boolean">false</try_separate_home>
      <proposal_lvm config:type="boolean">true</proposal_lvm>
    </storage>
  </general>
</profile>

So you can easily switch on/off LVM, use a separate partition for /home, enable/disable snapshots, enable/disable Windows resizing, etc. All that, still relying on the automated storage proposal to iron the details up. Something that is not possible with the current version of AutoYaST without being forced to define explicitly every partition and LVM volume.

But the simplest way to use the new libstorage proposal is to not define any setting at all in the AutoYaST configuration file. In that case, the partitioning proposal code will do the complete job, installing a new system with the default options.

Of course, before integrating the new storage stack into the upcoming SLE15, the AutoYaST support have to go one step further. Apart from using and configuring the proposal, it must be possible to define a completely custom setup including partitions, LVM volumes, software RAID devices and so on through the corresponding <partitioning> section of the AutoYaST profile. So we used this sprint to sketch a plan to make that possible in the following months, analyzing all the scenarios and configurations supported by AutoYaST and looking for the best way to support them using the existing yast2-storage-ng infrastructure. The outcome of that effort is this detailed document and a list of tasks (PBIs in Scrum jargon) for the upcoming sprints. So be prepared for more news in this regard.

Automatic Cleanup of Snapshots created by Rollback

So far the user had to ensure that snapshots created by rollbacks got deleted to avoid filling up the storage. This process has now been automated. During a rollback, Snapper now sets the cleanup algorithm to “number” for the snapshot corresponding to the previous default subvolume and for the backup snapshot of the previous default subvolume. This enhanced behavior will be available in SLE12-SP3 and openSUSE Leap 42.3. For more information take a look at the more detailed post in the Snapper blog.

Helping to bring the CaaSP fun to openSUSE

For several sprints already we have been presenting features targeted to SUSE CaaSP, the Kubernets-powered solution for managing containers. Many of those features and custom configurations live in a package called yast2-caasp, originally targeted to this great upcoming product built on top of the SLE12-SP2 codebase.

But now the package is also available for Tumbleweed-based systems by request of the Kubic project. Kubic will be the openSUSE alter ego of SUSE CaaSP, that is, a Container as a Service Platform based on openSUSE and Kubernetes. As with any other YaST component, the exact same source code will shared by the SUSE product and its openSUSE brother.

Improved UX when an invalid registration URL is provided

Humans make mistakes, but when the mistakes are made entering some option in
the installation command line, it usually means that a reboot of the machine is be needed to fix them.

That was the case for the registration URL (regurl) option. In the provided address was malformed the installation just stopped. During this sprint we have added an early check of that URL which allows the user to reenter it and continue with the installation. Something that obviously improves the user experience.

Invalid regurl handling in normal installation

In case of an autoinstallation (AutoYaST), the error is reported and the steps to get installer updates and to register the system are skipped.

Invalid regurl handling in autoinstallation

There is still room for more improvements, allowing the user to also modify the URL in other scenarios. For example, for an URL with a valid format but that points to an unreachable server. But in those cases is not so straightforward to identify the culprit of the problem. It would make no sense to annoy the user with a recurring pop-up to change the registration URL if the root of the issue is not the URL but a incorrect network configuration.

Translations and Interpolations

As mentioned at the begining of this post, we recently got quite some bug reports about missing translations. Although some of them were really caused by bugs in the YaST code, others were a consequence of a buggy Ruby rxgettext script which collects the translatable strings from the Ruby source code. The bug is known by the Ruby-GetText developers, but it’s unclear when (or whether) it will be fixed.

The problem is that the tool cannot collect the translatable strings from interpolations. For example it cannot find the “foo” string from this string literal: "#{_("foo")}". As a result, that string is missing in the resulting POT file and cannot be translated by the SUSE or openSUSE localization teams.

As a workaround, we fixed the YaST code to not use the translations inside interpolations. We also documented the possible problems when mixing translations a interpolations and their solution.

And talking about new developer oriented documentation…

Security Tips for YaST Developers

YaST runs with the administrator privileges (root) and therefore we have to be aware of the possible security issues in the code. During this sprint we published a document with a short summary of security tips for YaST developers.

If you are programming an YaST module you should definitely read it, but it might be interesting also for other programmers as many mentioned issues are generic, not tight only to YaST.

The document is available online here.

See you at the conference

That’s all for this sprint report. We have many more things in the oven, be we didn’t manage to finish them during the sprint, so they will have to wait for the next report. Meanwhile we hope to see many of you at the openSUSE Conference 2017. There will be a whole workshop about modern YaST development, a summary with the more relevant news in the last year of YaST development, talks about the new superb yast2-configuration-management module, about our continuous delivery infrastructure and about how we use Docker to deliver YaST… And, of course, also many other interesting content like the awesome presentation from Thorsten Kukuk about the brand new openSUSE Kubic we mentioned earlier. And even more important, a lot of fun!

openSUSE Conference 2017

For those of you that cannot attend to the conference, see you again in this little corner of the internet in three weeks!

Highlights of YaST development sprint 34

May 3rd, 2017 by

Here we go again! Only one week after our previous report, we already have a new bunch of (hopefully) exciting news. Let’s take a look to the outcome of our 34th Scrum sprint.

Trusted boot support for EFI

In the report of our 19th sprint, we already presented the new (at that point in time) and shiny Trusted Boot support in YaST2 Bootloader. So far, the only supported scenario was legacy boot (i.e. no UEFI) on x86_64 systems. Now, thanks to TPM2, is also possible use Trusted Boot with EFI, so we added support for it in our beloved bootloader module.

So now YaST Bootloader looks the same in non-EFI and EFI variants, no matter which underlying technology is actually used. Of course, YaST is only the tip of the iceberg, booting in Trusted Boot with EFI is possible thanks to all the tools that has recently added support for TPM2. openSUSE developers and packagers rock!

Configuring the NTP service in CaaSP

For a CaaSP cluster to work properly, it’s vitally important that all nodes have their clocks in sync. So, from now on, the installer is able to configure each node in a proper way and the administration node will act as NTP server for the worker nodes.

To achieve that, the user will be asked to specify one or several NTP servers to be used as time source during administration node installation and YaST will take care of the rest (updating the configuration and enabling the service).

If a NTP service is announced through SLP, YaST will propose automatically.

NTP configuration in YaST

For worker nodes, YaST will configure the system to keep it synchronized with the administration role.

Storage reimplementation: improvements in the guided setup

Through the previous reports, you have been able to follow the evolution of the renovated guided setup for the partitioning proposal. This sprint is not different, we have improved and adjusted that new wizard even further, making it smarter and more usable.

The new version is able to decide which steps to show depending on the current scenario. For example, in systems with only one disk the whole disk selection dialog will be skipped. The steps are also simplified by disabling widgets that are not applicable to the current situation. For example, if there is no previous Linux installation, the question about what to do with the existing Linux partitions will be disabled.

And talking about the actions to perform on preexisting partitions, that has also been improved. In the first guided setup version, these options were only displaying for illustrative purposes, but now they are 100% real and the proposal will honor their values, so the user can easily select what to do with previous Windows or Linux partitions. We even added a third option for other kind of partitions.

New settings in the storage proposal

Last but not least (regarding the guided setup), the password selection for encryption is now more usable, allowing the user to choose a not so strong password if really desired.

Allowing users to shoot their own feet

Insserv removal

YaST is a complex and large piece software. It means that time to time some pieces that used to be great and shiny become obsolete and end up being useless. The cycle of life. 😉

Some time ago, it was decided it was time for insserv to enjoy retirement and it was replaced by a stub. But there were still calls to insserv in YaST and we decided to remove them all. There were several reasons for that decision. Basicaly (open)SUSE has used systemd for couple of years already, so revisiting places where the YaST code depended on SySV was a must. As a side effect it shortened the list of YaST dependencies and, in the end, it is another small step towards smaller installation.

So good bye insserv, it was a pleasure to work with you.

Improvements in the ZFCP Controller Configuration for zKVM on S/390

When running the installer on a mainframe in a zKVM virtual machine it displays a warning about not detected ZFCP controllers:

ZFCP warning on S/390

However, when running in a zKVM virtual machine the disk is accessible via the virtio driver, not through an emulated ZFCP controller. The warning is pointless and confusing.

The fix was basically just an one-liner which skips the warning when the zKVM virtualization is detected, but the YaST module for ZFCP doesn’t usually receive to much maintenance, so we applied our boy scout rule and improved the code a bit.

The improvements include using Rubocop for clean and unified coding style, enabling code coverage to know how much the code is tested (in this case it turned out to be horribly low, just about 4%), removing unused files, etc… You can find the details in the pull request.

Storage reimplementation: improvements all around

As we reported in our report about Hack Week 15, we have been working on an alternative way to offer the power of the new storage library to the Ruby world. The new API is finally ready for prime-time and used in all the Ruby code.

We took the opportunity to greatly improve the developer documentation and to revamp the yast2-storage-ng README and status page.

We also did some extra checks and added automated testing to ensure our partitioning proposal ensure the requisites if a S/390 system using ZFCP, so mainframe users also have a peaceful transition to the new storage stack.

We also greatly improved the ability of the new library to work with alternative name schemes for the devices. Up to now, only using plain kernel device name (e.g. /dev/sda1) was fully supported. Now we can do all the operations (specially generating the /etc/fstab file) by device name, by UUID, by filesystem label, by device id and by device path.

More content already in the oven!

As you already know, at least we repeat it quite often, 😉 YaST was converted from YCP to Ruby some time ago. However, this conversion was done on language basis. Some old design decisions and principles stayed, like the usage of SCR for accessing the underlying system.

Some time ago we introduced CFA (Config Files Api Gem) as a more powerful and flexible Ruby-powered replacement for SCR. Although we have been using it for a while in several YaST modules, we felt the concepts and rationales behind its operation where not that clear.

So we have invested some time improving the documentation and writing a blog post to properly present and explain CFA to the world. We will publish it next week, so stay tuned!

Great news ahead!

The next sprint will be the first in which the whole YaST team will work together integrating the new storage stack in every single part of YaST. So we hope the next report to be full of good news about the expert partitioner, improvements in AutoYaST’s handling of disks and so on.

Of course, that would be only a small fraction of all the stuff we plan to work on. See you in three weeks with more news!

How we run our OpenStack cloud

January 23rd, 2017 by

This post it to document how we setup cloud.suse.de which is one of our many internal SUSE OpenStack Cloud deployments for use by R&D.

In 2016-06 we started the deployment with SOC6 on 4 nodes. 1 controller and 3 compute nodes that also served for ceph (distributed storage) with their 2nd HDD. Since the nodes are from 2012 they only have 1gbit network and spinning disks. Thus ceph only delivers ~50 MB/s which is sufficient for many use cases.

We did not deploy that cloud with HA, even though our product supports it. The two main reasons for that are

  • that it will use up two or three nodes instead of one for controller services, which is significant if you start out with only 4 (and grow to 6)
  • that it increases the complexity of setup, operations and debugging and thus might lead to decreased availability of the cloud service

Then we have a limited supply of vlans even though technically they are just numbers between 1 and 4095, in SUSE we do allocations to be able to switch together networks from further away. So we could not use vlan mode in neutron if we want to allow software defined network (=SDN) (we did not in old.cloud.suse.de and I did not hear complaints, but now I see a lot of people using SDN)
So we went with ovs+vxlan +dvr (open vSwitch + Virtual eXtensible LAN + Distributed Virtual Router) because that allows VMs to remain reachable even when the controller node reboots.
But then I found that they cannot use DNS during that time, because distributed virtual DNS was not yet implemented. And ovs has some annoying bugs are hard to debug and fix. So I built ugly workarounds that mostly hide^Wsolve the problems from our users’ point of view.
For the next cloud deployment, I will try to use linuxbridge+vlan or linuxbridge+vxlan mode.
And the uptime is pretty good. But it could be better with proper monitoring.

Because we needed to redeploy multiple times before we got all the details right and to document the setup, we scripted most of the deployment with qa_crowbarsetup (which is part of our CI) and extra files in https://github.com/SUSE-Cloud/automation/tree/production/scripts/productioncloud. The only part not in there are the passwords.

We use proper SSL certs from our internal SUSE CA.
For that we needed to install that root CA on all involved nodes.

We use kvm, because it is the most advanced and stable of the supported hypervisors. Xen might be a possible 2nd choice. We use two custom kvm patches to fix nested virt on our G3 Opteron CPUs.

Overall we use 3 vlans. One each for admin, public/floating, sdn/storage networks.
We increased the default /24 IP ranges because we needed more IPs in the fixed and public/floating networks

For authentication, we use our internal R&D LDAP server, but since it does not have information about user’s groups, I wrote a perl script to pull that information from the Novell/innerweb LDAP server and export it as json for use by the hybrid_json assignment backend I wrote.

In addition I wrote a cloud-stats.sh to email weekly reports about utilization of the cloud and another script to tell users about which instances they still have, but might have forgotten.

On the cloud user side, we and other people use one or more of

  • Salt-cloud
  • Nova boot
  • salt-ssh
  • terraform
  • heat

to script instance setup and administration.

Overall we are now hosting 70 instance VMs on 5 compute nodes that together have cost us below 20000€

Basic Nextcloud installation on openSUSE Leap

October 28th, 2016 by

Nextcloud Logo

I see the official documentation has full tutorial for RHEL 6 or CentOS 6 and RHEL 7 or CentOS 7. The main documentation covers Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

openSUSE already has the Nextcloud client packaged in Tumbelweed and the Server is in the PHP extra repo! Personally, I prefer to install eveything from official repository, so when an update is available, I can have it without a glitch. This tutorial describes how to install Nextcloud using command line. I followed the official documentation of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS installation.

Why choose openSUSE Leap? openSUSE Leap is a brand new way of building openSUSE and is new type of hybrid Linux distribution. Leap uses source from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), which gives Leap a level of stability unmatched by other Linux distributions, and combines that with community developments to give users, developers and sysadmins the best stable Linux experience available. Contributor and enterprise efforts for Leap bridge a gap between matured packages and newer packages found in openSUSE’s other distribution Tumbleweed. You can download openSUSE Leap from the site https://software.opensuse.org/.
(more…)

Highlights of YaST development sprint 25

September 28th, 2016 by

Another development sprint is over. Time flies! In our previous post we already reported about the branching of Tumbleweed and the upcoming releases and about the expected consequences: the landing of some cool features in a less conservative Tumbleweed.

We are still dedicating quite some effort to polish the upcoming stable releases (SLE12-SP2 and Leap 42.2), but in this sprint we finally found some time to play. Which is great because blogging about new features is more fun than doing it about bug fixes. 🙂

Importing Authorized Keys with AutoYaST

When logging in via SSH, public key authentication should be preferred over password authentication. Until now, the best way of setting up the required authorized_keys files in AutoYaST was using the files section.

However, that approach is tedious and error prone, as you need to make sure you set the correct owner, permissions, etc. Moreover you need to keep in sync the user definition (username and home directory) with the file definition.

AutoYaST now supports the specification of a set of public keys for each user with a pretty straightforward syntax:

<user>
  <username>suse<username>
  <authorized_keys config:type="list">
    <listentry>ssh-rsa your-public-key-1</listentry>
    <listentry>ssh-rsa your-public-key-2</listentry>
  <authorized_keys>
<user>

AutoYaST takes care of writing the files and setting the ownership and the proper permissions.

While documenting this new feature we realized the AutoYaST documentation about users management could be more detailed, which leads us to…

Improving the documentation

Usually developers love to create programs loaded with cool features but hate to write documentation. Fortunately there are people out there who enjoy writing documentation and bringing all those features to light. We have already mentioned in previous reports how grateful we are for having the SUSE documentation team polishing and publishing our documentation drafts and how open and straightforward the process is.

We updated the YaST documentation to include information about the installer self-update feature, which will debut in SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP2 and openSUSE Leap 42.2. As part of the same pull request and in the AutoYaST side, some additional improvements were made, including cleaning-up some duplicated information about SUSE registration.

On the other hand and as a consequence of the above mentioned new feature, the AutoYaST documentation regarding users management has been rewritten adding missing information like groups, user defaults and login settings.

All our pull requests are already merged in the doc-sle repository. At a later point in time, the SUSE documentation team will review and polish all the new content (including ours) and will publish an up-to-date version of the online documentation. If you don’t want to wait, you can easily generate an HTML or PDF version of the documentation including all the non-reviewed contributions just following the very simple instructions in the README file of the doc-sle repository.

Did we already mention we love the open source, programmer-friendly processes of the documentation team? 😉

Storage reimplementation: something you can touch

We promised news about the storage reimplementation and here they are. Our customized Tumbleweed image (labeled as NewStorage) in the storage-ng OBS repository can now perform some simple actions during installation and display the result to the user.

First of all, when proposing the timezone settings it will, as usual, check for MS Windows installations in the disk to guess if the hardware clock should be set to UTC. The news is that check is performed using the new storage stack, that offers more functionality in every sprint.

More important is that the installer will show the partitioning proposal calculated also using the new stack. As you can see in the screenshot below, the screen is way more simpler than the one you would find in a regular Tumbleweed. There are no buttons to change the settings or to run the expert partitioner yet. That doesn’t mean the functionality is not there, it’s simply that we prefer to focus first on modifying all the installer steps to use the new stack (what will enable us to use openQA) before refining every screen to add all options there.

The new partitioning proposal

Right now the system works only in disks containing a MS-DOS style partition table and will always propose a partition-based (no LVM) setup. That’s because we prefer to solve the hardest scenarios first. Using LVM and/or GPT partition tables is less challenging than the already supported scenario.

Reduce global warming by saving OBS build power

As you may know, we use the awesome Open Build Service (OBS) to generate both the YaST rpm packages and the openSUSE/SLE ISO images. Every time the source code of any component changes, OBS rebuilds that component and all the packages that depend on it.

Our beloved openSUSE and SLE release managers told us that there were several YaST packages that often triggered rebuild of other YaST packages, that triggered yet another rebuild, that triggered… you got the idea. 😉

The mentioned problem slows down the creation of new ISO images, interferes with the continuous integration process (specially visible in Tumbleweed) and wastes valuable OBS resources.

During this sprint we reduced the rebuild time of YaST by 30%. That’s for sure interesting, but knowing the details about how we did it could be even more interesting for many readers. We feared the explanation could be too complex and technical to fit into this report… which gives us just another opportunity for blogging. So expect an upcoming post including interesting technical stuff and crazy graphs like this one.

YaST dependencies graph

Some adjustment for the installer in the LiveCDs

One of the good things about working in open source is that sometimes the evolution of the projects you have created can surprise you. Quite some time ago, the YaST team dropped support for the live installer. It was simply too demanding to keep it alive while still doing our regular work (bug fixes and new features for YaST and the regular installer).

Recently the live installer was removed from Tumbleweed, the only system in which it was still available (after having been dropped in the past from stable openSUSE releases). One could have expected that somebody would decide then to step up and take the maintainership of the live installer.

But what actually happened was that Fabian Vogt decided to try a different approach we haven’t considered – adding the standard network installer to the LiveCDs images of Tumbleweed. He managed to make it work well enough and asked us for help to debug some problems. We fixed the initial problems by disabling the self-update functionality in the LiveCDs (it’s simply not designed to work on that scenario).

There are still quite some problems to be resolved to make everything work flawlessly, but if Fabian and others don’t give up, we will keep assisting them in order to bring the installation back to the LiveCDs… even in unexpected ways.

UI Designer

The YaST user interface is quite difficult to design and code. The main problem is that there is was no interactive UI designer where you could build a dialog or modify an existing one. Instead, you had to write new code or modify the existing code which creates and opens the dialog. Then, to see your changes you had to start the YaST module, go to the respective dialog and check its content. If it didn’t look like you intended, you had to close it, modify the code and start it again. And again… and again. Very annoying especially if the dialog is hidden deep in the module and you need to take several steps to get there.

During Hack Week 14, a project to improve the situation a bit was started. We already had a dialog spy which can be opened by Ctrl+Shift+Alt+Y keyboard shortcut, but that was read-only. You could only inspect the dialog tree and see the details of the selected widget but you could not change anything.

During that Hack Week project it was improved so it could edit the properties of the existing widgets, remove them or even add some new widgets. However the code was more or less a proof of concept than ready to be merged into the YaST UI and released to public. So we decided to finish it in this sprint.

As usual, it was harder than expected… but we made it and here is a short demo showing how it works and what you can do there:

The new UI designer in action

The new tool is still far from being perfect. The most obvious missing feature is that the dialog is changed in place and you cannot save or export you changes. After closing the dialog everything is lost. But it can still help to try things in the UI or make a quick prototype, specially when discussing solutions with interface designers. Hopefully we find some more time in the future to make it even better.

Storage reimplementation: encryption support

Although the partitioning proposal still does not support encryption or LVM, we implemented full LUKS (encryption) support in the underlying library (libstorage-ng). Together with the LVM support implemented in the previous sprint, that makes the new library already a valid replacement for the old libstorage in many situations and scenarios. Now it’s mainly a matter of switching from one version to another in every single YaST component, starting with the expert partitioner that we plan to start redesigning in the next sprint.

As usual, new features in the library are hard to illustrate, unless you accept the action diagrams as screenshots. In that case, here you can see the sequence of actions performed by the library when creating an encrypted home volume.

Creation of an encrypted home with libstorage-ng

Syncing keyboard layouts and console fonts in Leap and Tumbleweed

In parallel to our Scrum sprints, we have been for some time steady working, together with the openSUSE maintainers of X.Org and systemd, in redesigning how keyboard maps and console fonts are managed by YaST. Some changes were introduced in Tumbleweed some time ago but never made it to SLE (or Leap) because they needed more testing.

Recently Ludwig Nussel, the Leap’s release manager, decided that he wanted to sync 42.2 with Tumbleweed in that regard, using the new approach instead of the more conservative SLE one. Thus, we also invested quite some time coordinating again with Stefan Dirsch (X.Org) and Franck Bui (systemd) to push the changes just in time for the beta2 version of Leap 42.2… just in time to introduce bug#1000565, that was honored with its inclusion in the list of most annoying bugs in 42.2 Beta2.

The bright side is that a fix for the bug has already been provided (see bug report) and you can now finally test the new fonts and keyboard maps. Please, do so and provide feedback in order to get a properly localized Leap 42.2 release.

See you soon

As usual, this post was just a quick overview of the most interesting part of the sprint, because most people (including ourselves) don’t want to read about the boring part of the work, which is mainly fixing bugs.

The good news is that this time you will not have to wait another three weeks to read interesting stuff about YaST. As mentioned, we plan to publish a blog post about the reduction of the build time of YaST. And we will probably also publish a post about the visit of a YaST geecko to Euruko 2016.

So this time more than ever… stay tuned!

Highlights of YaST development sprint 23

August 18th, 2016 by

As already mentioned in our previous blog post, with Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase, the YaST Team is concentrating the firepower in fixing bugs in the installer. We fixed more than 40 bugs in three weeks! The dark side is that most bug fixes are not juicy enough for writing a blog post… but there is always some interesting stuff to report.

Integration of installer self-update with SCC and SMT

The installer self-update feature integrates now with SUSE Customer Center (SCC) and Subscription Management Tool (SMT) servers. Until now, there were three different mechanisms to get the URL of the installer updates repository:

  • User defined (using the `SelfUpdate` boot option).
  • Using an AutoYaST profile.
  • The default one, specified in the `control.xml` which is shipped in the media.

Now YaST2 is able to ask for the repository URL to SCC/SMT servers. The details of how the URL is determined are documented in the repository.

Fixes and enhanced usability in dialogs with timeout

As you may know, it’s possible to install (open)SUSE in an automatic, even completely unattended, basis using AutoYaST. AutoYaST can be configured to display custom configuration dialogs to the user and wait for the reply a certain amount of time before automatically selecting the default options. Until now, the only way for the user to stop that countdown was to start editing some of the fields in the dialog.

We got a bug report because that functionality was not working exactly as expected in some cases so, in addition to fixing the problem, we decided to revamp the user interface a little bit to improve usability. Now there are more user interactions that are taken into account to stop the counter, specially we added a new “stop” button displaying the remaining seconds. You can see an example of the result below.

New layout for dialogs with timeout

Following, as usual, the Boy Scout Rule we also took the opportunity to add automated tests to make that part of YaST more robust for the future.

Automatically integrating add-on repositories during installation

Sometimes you want to extend the regular installation media by adding just a few extra packages or provide a number of fixed packages along with the media.

For this purpose, the installer can automatically register an add-on repository. All you have to do is to put the repository on the installation medium and to add a file /add_on_products.xml that points to this repository.

The file looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<add_on_products xmlns="http://www.suse.com/1.0/yast2ns"
    xmlns:config="http://www.suse.com/1.0/configns">
    <product_items config:type="list">
        <product_item>
            <name>My Add-on</name>
            <url>relurl://myaddon?alias=MyAddon</url>
            <priority config:type="integer">70</priority>
            <ask_user config:type="boolean">false</ask_user>
            <selected config:type="boolean">true</selected>
            <check_name config:type="boolean">false</check_name>
        </product_item>
    </product_items>
</add_on_products>

You can define the following elements:

  • <name> is the name of your repository
  • <url> points the the repository location; you’ll likely want to use the relurl scheme here that gives the location relative to the main installation repository
  • <priority> is the repository priority (lesser number means higher priority, the main installation repository has priority 99)
  • <ask_user>: should the user be asked about adding the repository?
  • <selected>: should the repository be automatically selected?
  • <check_name>: should the repository’s actual name be matched against the value of the <name> element?

You can of course list several repositories in this file.

If you’re too lazy to remember all this, mksusecd can do all this for you.

For example, if you have a set of new kernel packages you would like to use, do:

mksusecd --create new.iso --addon kernel-*.rpm --addon-name 'my kernel' sles12-sp2.iso

This creates a new iso based on sles12-sp2.iso that will install your new kernel packages instead.

Storage reimplementation: small steps for the code, giant leap for continuous integration

During bug squashing we managed to find some time to keep the storage stack reimplementation rolling… slow and steady. The customized Tumbleweed images (labeled as NewStorage) in the storage-ng OBS repository are already able to analyze most systems, creating a representation of the system storage devices in memory that will be used to manipulate the disks and propose a partitioning schema. Unfortunately, this representation is only visible in the YaST logs since fixing installer bugs was more urgent than representing that information in the UI.

This turned to be an important milestone, not because of the functionality itself or the value of the code (we just added a couple of lines of Ruby code), but because for the first time the dependencies in some packages were switched from libstorage to libstorage-ng. That had important implications for the code organization and for our continuous integration infrastructure, specially the Travis CI integration, which implies the generation of .deb packages. We can now say that our continuous delivery workflow (from Github to OBS, passing through Jenkins, Travis, Coveralls and Code Climate) is free of any trace of the old storage code.

In addition, we also did some good progress in LVM support in the new library, being able to recognize and manipulate in memory all kind of LVM structures.

The joy of openness: updating the SUSE Linux Enterprise documentation

An important part of our job, specially as a new release date approaches, is helping to shape the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) documentation. One of the strongest points of SUSE products is the awesome SUSE’s documentation team which, as the rest of the company, have open source in their genes. Suggesting improvements and updates for the documentation is as straightforward as creating a pull request in the completely open documentation repository at Github… and anybody can do it!

The documentation team uses Docbook, but they would accept contributions in other formats (e.g. Markdown) and transform it themselves into Docbook… just because they are that cool. 🙂

Better support for ARM systems using EFI

The world is getting full of cool ARM64 devices and both SUSE and openSUSE are actively working in supporting as many of them as possible. We took another small step during this sprint improving the installer’s partitioning proposal for ARM systems that use EFI.

That’s not all, folks

As we always say, this was just the small portion of the work done that we consider exciting enough to be part of our development reports, since we don’t want to bore you with details about every single fixed bug. During this installer bug-fixing phase, this is more true than ever and the next sprint, which is already planned, will be similar to this in that regard. Nevertheless, in the next report we expect to have some interesting news about the installer self-update functionality and about the LVM support in the new storage stack. Stay tuned.

How to create an openSUSE Banana Pi M1 image with MATE Desktop

September 17th, 2015 by

I won a Banana Pi from ownCloud. So I tried to install openSUSE.

There are 3 options:

1. According to the wiki page, you can download the image they provide but there’s no kernel support for Mali400MP2 GPU (who knows if it’s fixed by now). No Mali mean no GUI. The link to image is http://download.opensuse.org/ports/armv7hl/tumbleweed/images/.

2. Download the image from http://www.lemaker.org. The GUI used is XFCE.

3. Do it the hard way, build it yourself. I would like to install MATE. I know, I could use the lemaker image.
I followed the page HowTo Build Banana Pi Image.

This post has 2 sections. The first is how to create the SD card and the next one is how to install MATE.
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DocBook Authoring and Publishing Suite (DAPS) 2.0 Released

June 23rd, 2015 by

After more than two years of development, 15 pre-releases and more than 2000 commits we proudly present release 2.0 of the DocBook Authoring and Publishing Suite, in short DAPS 2.0.

DAPS lets you publish your DocBook 4 or Docbook 5 XML sources in various output formats such as HTML, PDF, ePUB, man pages or ASCII with a single command. It is perfectly suited for large documentation projects by providing profiling support and packaging tools. DAPS supports authors by providing linkchecker, validator, spellchecker, and editor macros. DAPS exclusively runs on Linux.

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Create multi liveUSB with openSUSE

May 30th, 2015 by

I was trying to create a liveUSB with many distros. The reason is simple. All of my USB sticks were quite big for only one distro. So the rest of the USB space is wasted. For example, the openSUSE USBs I got from conferences, are 8GB. If I use installation DVD, I’m going to use only 4GB. LiveGNOME is only 1GB (the rest would be persistent drive for storage but personally, I don’t use it.

For that reason, I used 2 programs.

1. Multisystem.

I translated to Greek. Unfortunately, this software is installed only on Ubuntu/Debian distros. I used it also on Arch Linux but there was a problem lately and didn’t work correctly. On Ubuntu, I managed to insert 13.1 successfully and lately this was difficult to do. At the end of each time, there were some strange symbols running for a quite long time with a sound (I muted the sound for that reason). I think persistent drive for 13.2 and Tumbleweed wasn’t something that the creators of the program added.
DVD ISO and NET install ISO wasn’t at their list either.

2. YUMI

This works on Windows. At the end of the page there’s a version for Ubuntu/Debian (and source code). I didn’t test them.
I tested this tool and I inserted NET install ISOs to an old 512MB USB I had. The only “negative” is that there wasn’t room left for the ISOs I wanted. 90MB x 4 = 360MB. It adds syslinux stuff. Anyways, at least I can use a very old USB.
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Install ddclient on your openSUSE Raspberry Pi

May 25th, 2015 by

We’ve seen two Dynamic DNS clients. We’ll see another one here.

1. First of all, install the program.

$ zypper in ddclient

2. Create the confing file

$ nano /etc/ddclient.conf

with the following content

daemon=5m
timeout=10
syslog=no # log update msgs to syslog
#mail=root # mail all msgs to root
#mail-failure=root # mail failed update msgs to root
pid=/var/run/ddclient.pid # record PID in file.
ssl=yes # use ssl-support. Works with
# ssl-library

use=if, if=eth0
server=freedns.afraid.org
protocol=freedns
login=login_name
password=the_password
somedomain.mooo.com

Change the ones that are in bold letters.

3. Start the service

$ systemctl enable ddclient

Reboot